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The RSC’s Coriolanus 1972–73
Robert Ormsby

committed Marxist Tribune-artists who could successfully represent the People’s interests in the face of a dictatorial communist leadership. By contrast, Nunn’s Coriolanus emerged from within a social democracy, where the supposedly benevolent government intervention in the lives of its citizens that had characterized postwar British society was beginning to be undermined, especially by industrial action

in Coriolanus

Ralph Knevet's Supplement of the Faery Queene (1635) is a narrative and allegorical work, which weaves together a complex collection of tales and episodes, featuring knights, ladies, sorcerers, monsters, vertiginous fortresses and deadly battles – a chivalric romp in Spenser's cod medieval style. The poem shadows recent English history, and the major military and political events of the Thirty Years War. But the Supplement is also an ambitiously intertextual poem, weaving together materials from mythic, literary, historical, scientific, theological, and many other kinds of written sources. Its encyclopaedic ambitions combine with Knevet's historical focus to produce an allegorical epic poem of considerable interest and power.

This new edition of Knevet's Supplement, the first scholarly text of the poem ever published, situates it in its literary, historical, biographical, and intellectual contexts. An extensive introduction and copious critical commentary, positioned at the back of the book, will enable students and scholars alike to access Knevet's complicated and enigmatic meanings, structures, and allusions.

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Shakespeare’s voyage to Greece
Richard Wilson

foretaste of the future through its estranged vision of our past’, should coincide with Derrida’s reading of Hamlet as a play in which ‘what seems to be out in front, the future, comes back’, to presage the return of our repressed hope for a democracy to come. 10 In Specters of Marx Derrida set the scene for the messianic turn in Shakespeare studies when he decrypted the haunted vigil on the

in Free Will
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Veep, Homeland, and Scandal
Elisabeth Bronfen

Troubling vision of feminine countersovereignty Democracy, as Jacques Derrida has argued, has always wanted two incompatible things. On the one hand, it is predicated on a limited inclusion, welcoming only those perceived as being citizens, brothers, and compeers, while excluding all others, in particular persons deemed to be rogue. On the other, democracy also wants to open itself up to all those excluded, even though this gesture of hospitable incorporation remains limited and conditional. Salient for this tension, he notes, is that ‘it is typical for

in Serial Shakespeare
Shakespeare in the time of the political
Richard Wilson

hospitality owed to ‘houseless poverty’ [ Lear, 3,4,26–9 ]. It does, however, contextualize the problem his plays confront of squaring sovereignty with democracy. As the entrepreneurial investor operates behind scenes as an invisible agent, the episode even seems to be a paradigm of Shakespearean dramaturgy, where an almost modernist investment in the aesthetic in terms of a decision that never comes is

in Free Will
Abstract only
Richard Wilson

] himself. 3 In Free Will I argue that Shakespeare’s plays rehearse what political theorists like Claude Lefort describe as the ‘dissolution of the markers of certainty’ that made possible the advent of modern democracy, whereby the power embodied in the person of the prince, and tied to a transcendental authority, was eclipsed by new institutions in which power became ‘an empty

in Free Will
Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

democracy’: 42 Much of the inquiry will be based on deliberation, so that participants are provided with relevant information and evidence from a wide range of perspectives and given time to explore and debate the issues before coming to a reasoned opinion. 43

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
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The echoes of Rome in Julius Caesar
Richard Wilson

a breather’ [ Antony, 3,3,21 ], that will agitate all of Shakespeare’s later tragedies, as if this investiture crisis on the threshold of the modern public sphere, where everyone will find a ‘place in the commonwealth’ [ 40 ], indeed heralds a democracy to come composed out of the liberty of redistributed signs. But in this particular rite of spring we are still reminded of the earlier failures

in Free Will
Coriolanus in Budapest in 1985
Robert Ormsby

reformist politicians and bureaucrats within the communist party. 3 Yet, although by the late 1980s increased political pluralism and participation helped shape Hungary’s transition from a communist dictatorship to a capitalist democracy, goulash communism had arguably ‘infantilised people, reduced them to vulgar consumers of material goods’ (Molnár, Concise 332). Zoltán Márkus calls this compromise

in Coriolanus
Aesthetico-political misprision in Derricke’s A Discoverie of Woodkarne
Thomas Cartelli

Catholic excess (two clergy members at the dinner)’, p. 143. 16 Derricke, Image of Irelande , Plate III caption. 17 Derricke, Image of Irelande , Plate IV caption. 18 See, for example, Martín Plot, The Aesthetico-Political: The Question of Democracy in Merleau-Ponty, Arendt, and Rancière (London: Bloomsbury, 2014). 19 Derricke, Image of Irelande , p. 11. 20

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne