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Alireza F. Farahani and Azadeh Hadizadeh Esfahani

Introduction Doing development work and being reflective is a frustrating and confusing matter. Every decision in the field or in policy circles, or in interaction with academics, can be extremely challenging. If you have been through a rigorous critical education and you still want to do something to improve the material living conditions for people who have not benefited or have been harmed by prevailing development discourses, policies and practices, you are faced with dilemmas. If the desire to make a difference was missing, it would be easy to find an

in The power of pragmatism
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Place, society and culture in a post-boom era

Ireland is a turbulent place. This book engages readers with the contours of transformation of Irish society through a series of distinct episodes and sites where change can be confronted. The content of the book intersects with the boom and bust themes to explore the economic and social implications of the recession. The processes are as diverse as cross-border development, farming knowledges, food movements, and the evolution of traditional Irish music. The modernisation of Irish society during the Celtic Tiger and its subsequent demise was a 'spatial drama' involving transformation in the material landscape and the imaginative representation of the island. The first part of the book explores the revolving intersections of identity politics with place. It tracks the discovery of the ghost estate and the ways in which it has been implicated in debates about the Irish economic crash, complicating ideas of home and community. After a discussion on immigration, the book discusses the role of migrants in filling labour and skill shortages. The second part pays attention to questions of mobility and consumption in urban and rural contexts. The new Irish motorway network, free time, leisure and holidaying in the lives of lone parents during the Celtic Tiger, and the role of National Asset Management Agency (NAMA) are discussed. The third part explores diverse cultural practices and some longstanding representations of Ireland. An autobiographical tour of the pub session, National Geographic's representations of Irish landscape and the current Irish imagination are the key concepts of this part.

Mark Pelling, Alejandro Barcena, Hayley Leck, Ibidun Adelekan, David Dodman, Hamadou Issaka, Cassidy Johnson, Mtafu Manda, Blessing Mberu, Ezebunwa Nwokocha, Emmanuel Osuteye, and Soumana Boubacar

Introduction The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) challenge urban planners, risk professionals, researchers and citizens to extend their focus from accounting for the status of risk towards understanding and acting on the processes that can enable a transition to more risk-sensitive and transformative urban development across all contexts. Risk-sensitive development is required to reduce risk that has accumulated in the city and to better consider risk when planning new developments (Jones and Preston, 2011 ). This

in African cities and collaborative futures
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Creating places of vernacular democracy
Beata J. Gawryszewska, Maciej Łepkowski, and Anna Wilczyńska

resources, making them available at the same time. These include Schöneberger Südgelände, Park am Gleisdreieck in Berlin, Port Sunlight City wastelands Figure 3.1  Map of Warsaw in Liverpool or the Warsaw Praska Ścieżka Rowerowa [Praga Cycling Route] through the Vistula marshy meadows. Warsaw still has a relatively great number of wastelands as a result of its uneven development following the destruction of the Second World War, industrial collapse, absorption of agricultural lands as well as changes connected with railway infrastructure, etc. Many of these areas have

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
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Brian Rosa

century. Perhaps the most important and emblematic transformation of the railway arches in Manchester was Atlas Bar, opening in 1993 within an arch space formerly occupied by Atlas Motors, a car mechanic at the corner of Whitworth Street West and Deansgate. The new bar, tellingly, was jointly owned by a group of property developers and architects who were working on the post-industrial transformation of Knott Mill, the area located directly behind it. All of this was related to the work in the 1980s and 1990s of the Central Manchester Development Corporation, a public

in Manchester
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Natalie Bradbury

‘Northern Quarter’ and Ancoats locales, the initials snappily indicate its geographical location: NOrth of MAnchester city centre. For all its blandness, NOMA belies a more interesting identity, and one that is far more important to the history of the city and its social, cultural, political and architectural development than just a series of initials. In fact, the area could more accurately be branded the ‘Co-operative Quarter’, largely comprising the former estate of the Co-operative Group, the largest co-operative society in the UK, a major local employer, and an

in Manchester
Alex Schafran, Matthew Noah Smith, and Stephen Hall

In the previous chapter, we outlined an initial analytical framework for examining systems from the ground up. Any reformed spatial contracts must be based on the specific ways in which systems differ from each other. Applied to the disposal of human waste, a system-centred perspective would seek to understand the historical development of any given system. It would examine cultural feelings towards waste and the power dynamics in a given area with regard to who gets sewerage. It would understand the provision and education of sanitary engineers

in The spatial contract
Alex Schafran, Matthew Noah Smith, and Stephen Hall

Cultural imperialism of this sort directly undermines a healthy spatial contract by re/producing an uneven distribution of capacities for producing foundational reliance systems. The non-recognition of non-dominant groups in popular culture can impede the development of diverse expertise, let alone sufficient expertise in places where there are not enough trained professionals to operate systems. This ensures exclusion from control over the provisioning of many reliance systems. Furthermore, cultural imperialism directly undermines faith and trust in expertise

in The spatial contract
A Capability Approach based analysis from the UK and Ireland
Alma Clavin

, 1984) to unjust and uneven urban development has influenced a number of authors in their examination of urban community gardens. The results have shown both positive agency and wellbeing benefits of these spaces (e.g. Clavin, 2011) and also more critical accounts of how the spaces are limited in their ability to truly enhance political freedoms, overcoming asymmetric power relations (Certomà and Tornaghi, 2015; Rosol, 2012; Schmelzkopf, 1995). The development of urban community gardens generate local and participative forms of neighbourhood-​level politics and group

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Efrat Eizenberg

various benefits to even the mere exposure to nature (in a picture, through a window or by sitting in a park), i.e. a passive consumption of nature, if you will. The ‘practice’ of nature or deep involvement with it (as defined by Kaplan) through hiking, protecting, gardening and so on, produces an additional set of advantages. Advantages of ‘practising nature’ include exercise, community life, political development and place-​identity. This list presents only a few of the ways people experience nature, but we will get back to this topic later. Despite these advantages

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice