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1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

Introduction One of the goals of the photographers hired by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) during the 1990s and 2000s was to create images for the education of children and youth. For twenty years, CIDA sent these reproductions of images to schools in a multitude of formats, from magazines to videos, slide shows, games, picture books, and maps, produced in collaboration with academic specialists in education and the National Film Board of Canada (NFB). The attention and resources the international agency invested in the dissemination

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Megan Daigle, Sarah Martin, and Henri Myrttinen

Introduction By its very nature – ostensibly, that of responding to natural and human-made crises – humanitarian, peacebuilding and (to a lesser extent) development work occurs in close proximity to potential danger. The degree of risk and danger to staff carrying out this kind of work in ‘the field’ has increased greatly over recent decades, due in part to the changing nature of conflict and in part to the rapidly increasing number of local and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
A Belated but Welcome Theory of Change on Mental Health and Development
Laura Davidson

Introduction The UK government’s controversial decision to disband the Department for International Development (DfID) in June 2020 drew widespread condemnation ( UK Government Spending Review, 2020 ). However, two weeks prior to its merger with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, DfID published a new Theory of Change (ToC) on mental health for the international development sector – its last stand as a unitary body ( DfID, 2020 ). Despite the importance of the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Maurice Kamto

Introduction The fast development of major countries in Asia, particularly China, has fuelled the imagination of many African countries and the expectations of their peoples. 1 Each of them has set its own deadline to become an emerging economy. To meet such a target, they all expect to attract more and more foreign direct investment (FDI). There

in African perspectives in international investment law
Open Access (free)
Brad Evans

Introduction How we understand violence is key to how we conceptualise every single political category. We know nothing of claims to democracy, security, rights, justice and human development without attending to its underwriting demands. But what if the ways this understanding was framed rested upon highly contestable assumptions and political claims? We know violence is a complex phenomenon that continues to defy neat description. And we know it is poorly understood if reduced to actual bodily assault. Violence is an attack upon a person’s dignity, sense

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond and Catia Gregoratti

). Conjoining recent debates in feminist political economy and humanitarian governance in this paper we examine how prominent humanitarian actors such as corporations and celebrity activists construct gender-based problems and knowledge as part of entrepreneurial artisanal projects, aiming to empower women in the global South. Corporations have a long history of sponsoring and championing humanitarian as well as gender and development work to enhance the value of their brands and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

understand what’s happening around the world today as if there haven’t been people… theorising racism, nationalism, empire and gender for a century and warning of exactly what we see now.’ Moulded by Eurocentric knowledge systems, most of us react to such developments with utter shock. We – an imagined citizenry of respectable democracies – are horrified and appalled at how far we have been dragged from our liberal, more-or-less progressive self-image. And we are invited to consider whether we might be witnessing the end of the liberal humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Jeremy Sarkin

This article examines the ways in which missing persons have been dealt with, mainly in the former Yugoslavia, to show how the huge advances made in the search for, recovery and identification of those who disappeared is positively impacting on the ability of families to find their loved ones. The article surveys the advances made in dealing with the missing on a range of fronts, including the technical and forensic capacities. It examines some of the other developments that have occurred around the world with regard to the search for, recovery and identification of people and makes recommendations on how to make improvements to ensure that the rights of families around the world, as well as a range of other human rights, including truth and justice, are enhanced.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Lessons Learned for Engagement in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States
Logan Cochrane

’s Human Development Index were missing as of 2018. On the latter, as far as we are aware, no documents have brought together lessons from multiple donors and NGOs, and thus learning has remained donor-specific or project-based. A further challenge, as evidenced in the evaluations analysed in this study, is that actors have yet to act upon lessons they have learned, suggesting that other barriers need to be overcome in implementation. As of 2018, there were 194 organisations registered with the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN OCHA

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Aid Industry and the ‘Me Too’ Movement
Charlotte Lydia Riley

associated with sex work are all vulnerable to abuse. All women, in short, are at risk in the aid and development sector whether they are working for INGOs or recipients of aid, in all areas of the aid industry, both in Britain and overseas; but some women are more vulnerable than others. The aid industry’s uncomfortable relationship with its own imperial past also enables this abusive environment. This relationship has been explored as part of the new humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs