Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for :

  • "Development" x
  • Methods and Guides x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

important part of their research careers. In this chapter we will explore the history of research communication, from research professionalisation to the creation of learned societies and public lectures, the role of museums and exhibitions, covering almost four hundred years of notable research communication activities and setting the scene for developments from the twentieth century onwards which will be covered in the remainder of the book. This chapter will draw to a close at the outset of the twentieth century, at the end of an era when research had shifted from the

in Creative research communication
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

Despite C.P. Snow’s framing of the arts and science as two cultures with little common ground, art, science and technology have long been bedfellows (Snow, 1993 ). Advances in science and technology have stimulated developments in the arts as well as acting as inspiration for cultural activities, and visual techniques from the arts have been used to inform and facilitate research across a broad range of disciplines. From Brunelleschi’s early work on perspective, through to the modern day, examples of cross ‘cultural’ impact abound, with artists exploring

in Creative research communication
Open Access (free)
Designing and road testing new measurement scales
Patrick Callaghan

researchers and often focus on people’s ‘clinical’ outcomes, e.g. their symptoms. These clinical measures are often criticised by service users, especially if they do not tap into the priorities of the service users themselves (Crawford, 2011). As a result, we have seen increasing emphasis placed on the development of Patient Reported Outcomes Measures (PROMS). These tend to be less focussed on symptoms and more on the everyday experiences of people using services. They are much more likely to be designed and developed in collaboration with service users. The EQUIP research

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Andrew C. Grundy

questions and/or reducing the number of questions included in a scale, and commenting on ease of response and the emotional impact of its wording (Wiering et al., 2016). Is it too distressing or demoralising for example? Questionnaire development can be a complex and time-consuming process, and we will learn more about this in Chapter 6. Similarly, when it comes to designing focus group or interview topic guides, service users often ask different questions to non-service users (Rose et al., 2004). Gillard et al. (2010) compared ‘academic-researcher’ and ‘service user

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

a whole. For example, the following sentence could be a useful way to signpost how this paragraph fits into the essay: In this way, the liberation movement has perhaps inadvertently helped to produce heteronormativity by seeking legitimacy for LGBTQ identities. By stitching this new final sentence into the paragraph and making the other revisions suggested, the extract is transformed into a conceptually strong, clearly written paragraph that serves as a coherent contribution to the argument’s development. The paragraph

in The craft of writing in sociology
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

exercise a great deal of local control (Heller et al., 2007 ). The state’s population size is also the equivalent to that of some nations – another reason why it is perhaps an unusual location for civic participation at a local level. Yet deliberative democracy has been used in a number of contexts within Kerala, including, but not restricted to, local government, sustainable development, working conditions and health reforms. The most significant driver for this was the People’s Campaign for Decentralised Planning. Originating from a left-wing government in

in Creative research communication
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

with medical and health settings, resulted in growing attention to the role and treatment of people within the research process. Codes of professional ethics first appeared in the medical community during the nineteenth century, with the American Medical Association producing the first code of medical ethics in 1848 (Attfield, 2012 ). However, a number of the most significant ethical developments emerged following experimentation that occurred during the Second World War (Smith Iltis, 2006 ). One of the most significant codes, the Nuremberg Code of 1949

in Creative research communication
Helen Brooks, Penny Bee, and Anne Rogers

the factors that influence the choice of appropriate qualitative research method 3. Understand how to carry out research utilising qualitative research methods 95 BEE (RESEARCH) PRINT.indd 95 11/05/2018 16:15 Introduction What is qualitative research and why and when should we use it? Qualitative research provides an understanding of a topic in its contextual setting giving explanations and accounts of why people do the things they do. It can also help evaluate the effectiveness of interventions and aid the development of theories and strategies. Qualitative

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

create their own digital projects. It is now relatively easy to create a website or other presence for your research on the internet, allowing researchers to become publishers of their own content, though other approaches, such as app development, may require specialist skills and interdisciplinary collaboration. Much of the growth in digital public engagement projects comes about because it is now so much easier to create and share content on the web, using what are now commonly referred to as Web 2.0 technologies. Web 2.0, a term first coined by DiNucci in

in Creative research communication
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

and this issue fit into the broader cluster of issues, questions, theories and developments in the field of race and ethnicity studies in general. Lecturers tend to choose the key readings for a course from the major thinkers on a topic, or to select articles and chapters that include good reviews of the material in that area. The latter in particular often include references to other important books and articles in the specific field. So, to begin reading more widely, look at the bibliographies of the required readings and pick out those that seem to be

in The craft of writing in sociology