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Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

belongings the assessors rated at less than £ 1. And by definition such records omit altogether those, unquestionably present in significant number, with nothing. Of all the fault-lines which are evident in our sources, it is not easy to identify a single one which had primacy in determining social development. It is hard, not only because the lines of tension were so diverse but because the life

in Towns in medieval England
Anthony Musson and Edward Powell

problems of local justice was found in the development of the county circuits of assize and gaol delivery. Groups of commissioners hearing actions concerning landownership and property right (the petty or possessory assizes) and trying prisoners charged with felony held in royal (and privately owned) gaols had been sent into the provinces since Henry III’s reign supplementing the responsibility of the eyre for

in Crime, Law and Society in the Later Middle Ages
Abstract only
E.A. Jones

merchants’ warehouses near the wharf on the River Wensum, in one of late medieval England’s biggest and busiest cities. 23 Demographic changes are also an important factor in the development of the hermit’s vocation during the late Middle Ages. The differences between a typical twelfth-century hermit and his fifteenth-century counterpart are more striking than the corresponding differences between central and

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

. From small things it progressed to great things, and from great things to the greatest ones. For it went through three phases, namely the states of creation, development, and perfection. At the time of its creation it was very small. At the time of its development it was fairly large. And at the time of its perfection, it was—and is now—very great and powerful. For this is the manner and process of development, namely to begin from small

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

procedures, and finally the liturgical ceremonial that were involved whenever an individual expressed the intention of becoming an anchorite. By the end of the Middle Ages, a comparable framework was in place for the vocation of hermit, though only as a much more recent development. A system of episcopal scrutiny and supervision of potential anchorites seems to have existed by the end of the twelfth century, and provides a context for the

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

founded the city of Alba; and Janus, who expanded the city of Genoa, which at that time was small and humble. 10 So according to this, Janus’ expansion and development of Genoa occurred during the period in which Troy was destroyed. We know from the chronicles that Troy was destroyed in the time of Samson, a very strong man; therefore Genoa was expanded during his time. 11 And if we

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
C. E. Beneš

walls—fostered the development among these cities’ inhabitants of a particularly urban group identity or civic consciousness: a sense of collective identity focused on citizenship in, or at least belonging to, the urban community; a sense of ownership pertaining to the city, including its physical space and monuments; and a sense of the importance of one's own city on the broader stage of human history. 15

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

underscored the idea that anchorites were dead to the world by numerous striking echoes of the medieval liturgy of death and burial: from the procession through the cemetery to reach the cell, to the psalms and antiphons chosen, the performance of the ‘last rites’, the open grave and the sprinkling of dust upon the recluse. 3 The verbatim recording of an anchorite’s profession [ 6 ] is a late development, and perhaps

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

of the twentieth century, when the feverish construction of offices and shopping-centres briefly opened archaeological windows on to the origins and sequence of urban development. In consequence the Museum of London, successor to the Guildhall Museum, and numerous sister institutions in the regions now house collections of material objects which can give substance to a medieval urban history

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

less urban populations comprised both aristocrats and socially more modest immigrants who all shared roots in the country. The English kings did not tend naturally to extend the privileges which were enshrined in London’s first charter; nor did they ever allow the development of fully independent communes such as were becoming familiar at this period in parts of the Italian and German territories. 3 But King John’s financial

in Towns in medieval England