Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 30 items for :

  • "Early Modern" x
  • Philosophy and Critical Theory x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Rainer Forst and the history of toleration
Teresa M. Bejan

lengthy discussion of Rawls’s Political Liberalism . 23 That is, to make good on Rawls’s offhand remark in that work, that ‘the historical origin of political liberalism (and of liberalism more generally) is the Reformation and its aftermath, with the long controversies over religious toleration in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries’. 24 As the historical account of early modern toleration debates in ch. 5 of TiC demonstrates, Forst agrees. Yet he insists that, although it is ‘a child of toleration’, liberalism (whether Lockean or Rawlsian) must not be

in Toleration, power and the right to justification
David McGrogan

are typically thought of in relation to liberalism in a different light. Roughly, the schema which is often sketched out in this regard is as follows. As the early modern period progressed, rule became increasingly concerned with what Foucault called “biopolitics” – “the attempt … to rationalise problems posed to governmental practice by phenomena characteristic of a set of living beings forming a population: health, hygiene, birthrate, life expectancy, race.” 53 (Much of this will of course be evident from our previous discussion.) In other words, for reasons

in Critical theory and human rights
Open Access (free)
An epilogue
Saurabh Dube

immense isolation of the modern individual, a subject stalking an alienated temporality and a spatial indeterminacy. 15 On the other, Muktibodh’s “intensely self-conscious, anguished poetic voice abandoned the high modernism of Europe and America for experimental, radical, sometimes surreal sequences that draw equally upon the Bhakti tradition of late medieval [early modern] India as upon other

in Subjects of modernity
David McGrogan

analogies, both of them pointed in two different directions, which have been present as aids to reflection on the nature of the State since its emergence. Tracing their heritage back to Roman times, in the early modern period both already existed in some form or other with respect to various disparate phenomena, which we will discuss in due course, and they became thereby inherited as conceptual frameworks by thinkers engaged in the tentative exploration of Statehood once that concept came into consideration. There is a great deal more to be said about this historical

in Critical theory and human rights
Open Access (free)
Andrew Bowie

being ‘subverted’ by its failure to provide a stable ground for philosophy, because, for example, of its dependence on language or on the unconscious. The point is, however, that such ideas are not the radically new insights as which they have often been presented. Related ideas already play a central role in some of the reflections upon subjectivity which immediately follow Kant and are implicit in some of Kant’s own arguments. Furthermore, these theories from the early modern period can actually be shown both to have helped initiate the ideas which inform current

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Catherine Baker

(leading to much more literature about this representation of race in early modern Venice than the history of race in early modern Venice itself), probably originated from existing traditions of painting Muslims and Egyptians as black Africans (Kaplan 2011 : 47–9). Though Rijeka was Habsburg (Hungarian Croatia's main port) not Venetian, Italianate heritage is part of its contemporary identity. Other Moorish characters and blackface customs appear in Dalmatian/Croatian folk traditions further south, including Dubrovnik/Ragusa (independent until annexed by Napoleon in

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Abstract only
Democratic state, capitalist society, or dysfunctional differentiation?
Darrow Schecter

markedly different degrees depending on the national context, by the modern state. He largely dismisses the crucial mediating capacities that Hegel attributes to key institutions of civil society, insisting instead that capital and the managers of the industrial economic system have become the commanding power of the civil sphere and of society more generally. In his early writings, he contrasts the democracy of unfreedom characteristic of the feudal period with the political emancipation ushered in by the early modern revolutions in Britain, North America, and France

in Critical theory and sociological theory
Open Access (free)
Entanglements and ambiguities
Saurabh Dube

’s manner of being in the world, namely, narrative.” 66 It is equally worth reflecting on how Braudel’s seminal writings have not only rendered entire regions of the Mediterranean world as islands floating outside the currents of civilization and history, but further cast as ahistorical the sphere of everyday “material culture,” especially when compared with the historical dynamism of early modern

in Subjects of modernity
Abstract only
Darrow Schecter

manage select­ ive de-​differentiation. Systems clearly need steering of some kind as well as a rigorous constitutional framework promoting steady inter-​systemic communication. From the time of the early modern revolutions (in Britain, the United States, and France) until the present day, the state has been entrusted with this task. Without wishing to indulge in excessive speculation, it is possible that centralised mediation was the dystopian unconscious dream of fascist and state socialist political systems. Be that as it may, states that are generally considered to

in Critical theory and sociological theory
Looming constitutional conflicts between the de-centralist logic of functional diff erentiation and the bio-political steering of austerity and global governance
Darrow Schecter

find ways of coexisting with socially constituted statehood. One likely objection can be immediately anticipated:  how is statehood possible without relying on the modern state as its foundation? The short answer, which will be developed in some detail below, can be summarised as follows: according to a line of argument often associated with certain strands of early modern republicanism and social contract theory, it is frequently FD AND MEDIATED UNITY IN QUESTION 107 supposed that liberal democracies are founded on intensive, deliberative citizen participation

in Critical theory and sociological theory