Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29 items for :

  • "Early Modern" x
  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Philip D. Morgan

The study of the early modern Atlantic world has come of age in the twenty-first century. Books on the subject pour off the presses in dazzling – and dizzying – profusion. In recent years at least sixty books with the words ‘Atlantic’ or ‘Atlantic World’ in their titles have been published annually. A decade ago, the comparable number could be counted on the fingers of one hand. 1 This dramatic increase in such a short space of time is a testament to the cascading interest in the subject. Works that explore some aspect of the movement and

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered
Abstract only
Violence and the state - past, present and future
Matt Killingsworth, Matthew Sussex, and Gavin Daly

European states assumed a monopoly on the use of violence through dual processes of internal pacification and international war making. Even allowing for contemporary trends towards asymmetric conflict, the state has proven itself as a potent war-fighting institution. Closely related to the demonstrated capacity of the state to conduct war was the emergence in the early modern period of the idea of raison

in Violence and the state
The French experience, 1792-1815
Gavin Daly

Early Modern European ‘Military Revolution’, a concept pioneered by Michael Howard and later modified and developed by Geoffrey Parker. 3 This holds that technological and tactical changes – gunpowder, musketry and artillery – lead to the creation of large standing armies and the growth of fiscal-military states over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The French Revolutionary

in Violence and the state
Imogen Richards

economic model it provides a means for underprivileged workers to improve their quality of life. This has proven a popular fallacy, inconsistent with the reality of much neoliberal economic enterprise. A core philosophical contradiction of neoliberalism is that it promotes the values of individualism and competition, despite the fact that the means by which people can compete to improve their socio-economic situations are often limited. Resembling the individualising ideals of early modern capitalism, the individualist ideology of neoliberalism is reinforced by

in Neoliberalism and neo-jihadism
Vicky Randall

with respect to the Ottomans … Europeans in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries could not and did not imagine themselves as a united, superior and self-sufficient territory, which could provide a basis for Orientalist thinking as Said assumes’. 10 As examples of this variegated discourse in Britain during the early modern period, Çırakman cites Richard Knolles’ The General Historie of the Turkes (1603); George Sandys’ A Relation of a Journey (1615); Henry Blount’s Voyage into the Levant (1634); and Francis Osborne’s Political Reflections upon the

in History, empire, and Islam
Abstract only
Understanding violence and the state
Matthew Sussex and Matt Killingsworth

violence and statehood have historically been closely linked. 16 Across the early modern era, the growing demands of war assisted in state consolidation through the maintenance of large standing armies, the increasing professionalisation of the military classes, the integration of war materiel into industrialisation processes, and mass state taxation. 17 Prior to modernity

in Violence and the state
Imogen Richards

capitalism. In the 1940s, these reforms were guided by the protectionist welfare principles recommended in John Maynard Keynes’ The general theory of employment, interest, and money ( 1936 ). After several decades of Keynesian influence, a global order characterised by relatively unrestricted markets with allowances for state capital controls came to be described as ‘embedded liberalism’ ( Ruggie 1982 ). While for some, contemporary neoliberalism represents an extension and intensification of nineteenth-century early modern capitalism and twentieth-century embedded

in Neoliberalism and neo-jihadism
Vicky Randall

British History ( London : Routledge , 1995 ), p. 229 . 19 Gerard Winstanley, The Law of Freedom in a Platform (1652), available at www.marxists.org/reference/archive/winstanley/1652/law-freedom/ch01.html . 20 See Janelle Greenberg , The Radical Face of the Ancient Constitution: St Edward’s ‘Laws’ in Early Modern Political Thought ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 2001 ). 21 Clare A. Simmons , Reversing the Conquest: History and Myth in Nineteenth-Century British Literature ( London : Rutgers University Press , 1990 ), p. 18 . 22

in History, empire, and Islam
Josefina A. Echavarria

fluidity ‘of all those boundaries that the early modern taught us to construct as sharp lines between self and other, this state and that state’, and they converge ‘as a consequence of contemporary reengagements with all those hard questions about who we are and what we can be that Hobbes and his successors thought had been answered once and for all in the twin absolutes of a unitary sovereignty and a

in In/security in Colombia
Giuliana Chamedes

Giuliana Chamedes identifies two distinct visions that characterized the ideological construct of the ‘Atlantic order’ for the post-war world: a liberal-democratic American and British narrative that helped the United States strengthen its political and economic ties with Europe so as to protect a shared democratic worldview; and another vision, advanced by the Holy See, a handful of European Christian Democratic leaders, and certain key American Catholic opinion-makers, which did not have ‘democracy’ as its endgame. Rather, it proposed to build a peaceful transnational post-war order through the reconstitution of the ‘Christian West’, an early-modern concept of the ‘Old and the New World’ which was defined as an imagined community built on a shared commitment to Christian principles. This move enabled them to embrace the ‘Atlantic Community’, all the while remaining wedded to a conservative, anti-liberal, and anti-communist worldview.

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered