Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 74 items for :

  • "East Asia" x
  • Manchester International Relations x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Suetyi Lai
and
Li Zhang

5 Public diplomacy of the European Union in East Asia Suetyi Lai and Li Zhang Introduction When public diplomacy broadly refers to attempts by one government to influence foreign publics, governments from Europe have been among the first to practise it, for example with the establishment of the Alliance Française in 1883 and of the British Council in 1934. Yet the public diplomacy of the EU as a collective institution appeared much later, while studies of public diplomacy itself focus mostly on the country level. This chapter is devoted to understanding the

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

she organises into three groups by the geographical regions they come from: South East Asians (from Cambodia, Burma and Thailand), Africans and the third group, comprising Iraqis, Iranians and Afghans. She discovers differences in their ability to use telecommunications technology (e.g. telephones, fax machines and mobile phones), depending on their countries of origin, suggesting that conflict, war or government surveillance hindered their abilities. Leung also observes that exposure to new

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

). CIDA ( 1989–90 ) Annual Report ( Ottawa : CIDA ). CIDA ( 1990a ), East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific, Activity Sheet. Families of the World ( Hull, QC : Media-Sphere, Youth Editions ). CIDA ( 1990b ), Eastern Caribbean ( Hull, QC : Media-Sphere, Youth Editions ). Bilingual poster . CIDA ( 1991–95 ), Somewhere Today / Aujourd’hui quelque part ( Hull, QC : Media-Sphere, Youth Editions ). Published four times during the school year. Thematic issues included La fête!; Going to School; My School, Your

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps
,
Lasse Heerten
,
Arua Oko Omaka
,
Kevin O'Sullivan
, and
Bertrand Taithe

, these references also lead us into the global 1960s. It is only partly true that Biafra was the first postcolonial conflict that was discussed as a genocide – but the way these references worked changed with Biafra. Already before the American war in South East Asia, what is usually called the Vietnam War was then described as possibly genocidal. This was something that many New Leftists at least were concerned about. Some of their leading figures and intellectuals associated

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

which a resurgent Russia has stepped. These are structural shifts in the sense that even the most liberal government in the US would find it hard to throw its weight around when China is always available – in South East Asia, in Africa, in Central Asia – to provide financing and diplomatic support with few strings attached (and to threaten forms of retaliation when such inducements fail). The rise of Trump can even be explained as a reaction to a sense of gathering national decline, hence his campaign slogan: ‘Make America Great Again

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan
and
Otto Farkas

required to sustain human health and life are not recovering from growing environmental stress, natural disasters and climate-change impacts ( IFRC, 2018 ; IPBES 2019 ; Myers et al. , 2017 ; Whitmee et al. , 2015 ). The World Health Organization ( WHO, 2016 ) estimated that exposure to ‘unhealthy environments’ caused 12.6 million deaths in 2012, with South East Asia and Western Pacific bearing the highest burden, of 7.3 million deaths. In 2015, exposure to environmental

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Inter-regionalism in a new era
Julie Gilson

and the continuing rise of Chinese power (Ling, 2013). Since that time, Europe too has begun to reconsider the state of its own relations with East Asia, and some observers witness the start of a pivot by the European Union (EU) towards East Asia (see, for example, Casarini, 2013; Ungharo, 2012). This view has enjoyed high-level support, not least from EU High Representative Federica Mogherini, who stated that: “I have always been convinced that we should together pivot to Asia, the US and the EU” (cited in Twining, 2015). Similarly, at a “Friends of Europe

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific
Reuben Wong

unlike the US and China (Yeo and Matera, 2015). The US is predominantly viewed as the guarantor of stability and security in the region, with a rising China challenging the postwar security system built by the US after Japan’s surrender and the retreat of European colonial powers (Katzenstein, 2005; Proszowska, 2016: 66). Stares and Régaud’s thesis that the EU would need to project military power in East Asia, fell short primarily because a necessary precondition – the securitisation of EU–Asia relations – did not happen. As the engine of global economic growth shifted

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific
Elena Atanassova-Cornelis

development and stability of East Asia by means of “soft power”, namel, through trade and investment, provision of Official Development Assistance (ODA) and participation in confidencebuilding measures (European Commission, 1994, 1995). It seems that already in the early 1990s Tokyo was regarded as being sufficiently qualified to become Brussels’s strategic partner in Asia. The progress in European integration from the early 1990s on and, related to it, the EU’s willingness and ability to assume a larger global role have further stimulated Brussels to seek a deeper

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific
Fulvio Attinà

in the East Asia Summit (EAS) as well as in the enlarged meeting of ASEAN Defence Ministers. In that year, the East Asia Policy Guidelines were published by the Council of the EU to provide a broad orientation for the EU and the member states on the maritime and territorial disputes in East Asia. The Council did not take sides on the sovereignty issues and advocated diplomatic and peaceful conflict resolution according to international law, without any threat or use of force. Further landmarks of the EU engagement in the security of Asia are the EU’s strategic

in The European Union in the Asia-Pacific