Search results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • "Economic governance" x
  • Human Geography x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
The bridge, the fund and insurance in Dar es Salaam
Irmelin Joelsson

the economic governance of Tanzanian social insurance schemes produces a tension between the collective hedging against various contingencies and the extractive aspects of investments and the returns on capital. Here the bridge, rather than hedging, protecting and securing, instead might institutionalise new architectures of risk through unexpected (material, political and ethical) effects. The fund is understood as a social security infrastructure. It operates as a policy assemblage performing a number of bureaucratic tasks. Its operations aim

in African cities and collaborative futures
Open Access (free)
From an ‘infrastructural turn’ to the platform logics of logistics
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

finished the volume (and rewrote this conclusion) some time after the research was completed, at a moment when the COVID-19 global pandemic in the space of three months rewrote the script of normality. What had been normal in daily life, work life, state actions and economic governance was up for grabs. As the pandemic made global connections at a speed rarely anticipated, what happened in Wuhan suddenly became profoundly relevant in Tehran, in Madrid, in Lombardy, London, New York and New Orleans as much as in Cape Town, Kampala, Lagos, Dar es Salaam or Johannesburg

in African cities and collaborative futures
Open Access (free)
Situating peripheries research in South Africa and Ethiopia
Paula Meth, Alison Todes, Sarah Charlton, Tatenda Mukwedeya, Jennifer Houghton, Tom Goodfellow, Metadel Sileshi Belihu, Zhengli Huang, Divine Mawuli Asafo, Sibongile Buthelezi, and Fikile Masikane

, including economic, governance, environmental, political, individual, etc., at multiple scales. We argue that the diversity of such drivers of change is significant and it suggests simplistic accounts of the peripheries are highly problematic. Our research reveals that in some areas, large-scale formal investment is evident (such as in Tulu Dimtu in Addis), while other areas are predominantly characterised by informal development or a complex mix of formal and informal processes, as in Molweni in eThekwini and Winterveld in Tshwane. We argue that theoretical framings

in African cities and collaborative futures
Open Access (free)
Urban presence and uncertain futures in African cities
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

. In the context of late twentieth-century global forms of economic governance and structural readjustment programmes led by international regimes of lending and investment, Jane Guyer, a former member of the World Bank International Advisory Group and distinguished anthropologist of sub-Saharan Africa – whose work so influenced Mbembe – has highlighted the power of cultural constructions of the temporal for an understanding of African life. Foregrounding the counterintuitive similarities between late twentieth-century forms of monetarism and evangelical Christianity

in African cities and collaborative futures
Open Access (free)
Urban transformation and public health in future cities
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

economic systems of the last fifty or so years; regimes of economic governance commonly characterised as neoliberal in the global north and its spheres of global influence, the dramatic rise of some middle-income countries in the late twentieth century, particularly in south-east Asia, and the distinctive China model of economic growth and social governance in the twenty-first century. All create contested urban development landscapes in which the logics of public health initiatives must intervene. In an urbanised and connected world, how to design spaces conducive to

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Luiz Eduardo Soares

direction of this democratising process is the counter-reformation, guided by a neo-liberal economic governance agenda in alliance with the most conservative moral supporters and skilled at articulating themselves with rhetoric, calling for tougher laws, longer sentences, more freedom for the arms trade, the war against drugs and the criminalisation of poverty, and more police violence. To crown this perverse agenda, they advocate policies that destroy the environment and annihilate the lands of the indigenous peoples. Under such an empire of hatred, the political culture

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city