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A plea for politics at the European level
Peter J. Verovšek

seeks to enable ever-purer market competition, but that also takes social policies and workers’ rights into account. Some steps in this direction have already been taken. Although the French government has been arguing for the need for gouvernement économique – an ‘economic government’ as opposed to mere ‘economic governance’ – for some time, recently even the traditionally reluctant Germans have started to speak of Wirtschaftsregierung . Although these moves are still in the early stages, Luuk van Middelaar argues that this development is important because

in Memory and the future of Europe
Memory, leadership, and the fi rst phase of integration (1945– 58)
Peter J. Verovšek

, Schuman, and Adenauer in their commitment to the community method based on transnationally shared collective memories of the rupture of 1945. Jacques Delors, the President of the European Commission, French President François Mitterrand, and German Chancellor Helmut Kohl once again sought to build on the constructive resources of the past. The result was that ‘economic governance in Europe went through its deepest transformation since the end of World War II, leading to the emergence of a distinctive European model of political economy.’ 82 It is these two periods to

in Memory and the future of Europe
Eurosclerosis (1959– 84) and the second phase of integration (1985– 2003)
Peter J. Verovšek

-1980s and 1990s, ‘In less than two decades, economic governance in Europe went through its deepest transformation since the end of World War II, leading to the emergence of a distinctive European model of political economy.’ 67 In addition to these political changes brought about by the leadership of Jacques Delors, François Mitterrand, and Helmut Kohl, this period also represents the culmination of the classical narrative of integration. The institutions needed to address these challenges and to allow the practice of solidarity beyond state borders began to

in Memory and the future of Europe
The Eurozone crisis, Brexit, and possible disintegration
Peter J. Verovšek

productivity and greater competitiveness in international trade, and an overvaluation in the south, leading to a decline in competitiveness in export markets. While the experience of a relatively weaker currency allowed the export-driven economies of the north to run large current accounts surpluses, the comparatively strong euro encouraged the southern member-states to import goods, causing them to run ever-larger deficits. The crisis has shown that ‘a monetary union which is based on loose rules on budget/tax/economic governance will remain incomplete and unsustainable

in Memory and the future of Europe