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Peter John, Sarah Cotterill, Alice Moseley, Liz Richardson, Graham Smith, Gerry Stoker, and Corinne Wales

Trust, interested in increasing electoral turnout. The letters advised recipients that we would be contacting them to discuss voting and provided contact details to enable recipients to register any concerns. The door-to-door canvassing was coordinated by the Institute for Political and Economic Governance, a University of Manchester research institute. The canvassers were predominantly postgraduate students who were enthusiastic about raising electoral turnout, had a good knowledge of the research topic, and had an interest in the objectives of the project

in Nudge, nudge, think, think (second edition)
Tom Gallagher

campaign focused on the Chancellor as an epitome of caution and common sense. ‘We had four good years’ she remarked in the aftermath of her victory. No other eurozone leader could dare to make such a claim in 2013 and it showed how introspective the mood in Germany had become. The long election campaign had delayed key decisions on the extent to which Europe would be subject to economic governance. Complicated negotiations between the CDU and potential coalition partners stretched ahead which threatened to put back the timetable for a proposed banking union towards 2016

in Europe’s path to crisis
Ben Cohen and Eve Garrard

of global economic governance (World Trade Organization, International Monetary Fund, World Bank) to achieve these goals, and we support fair trade, more aid, debt cancellation and the campaign to Make Poverty History. Development can bring growth in life-expectancy and in the enjoyment of life, easing burdensome labour and shortening the working day. It can bring freedom to youth, possibilities of exploration to those of middle years, and security to old age. It enlarges horizons and the opportunities for travel, and helps make strangers into friends. Global

in The Norman Geras Reader
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Routes away from crisis
Tom Gallagher

financial speculators. The search for a new centralising framework meant to establish economic governance occurs at a sometimes glacial pace because it has to accommodate the perspectives of the various interest groups entrenched in the EU power structure. The impression is given of an oligarchy of interests scrambling to stabilise a project that has badly lost its way. A prominent casualty has been the European values that are supposed to provide solidarity for members in difficulty, but that are now increasingly rhetorical ones. In order for such a nadir to be reached

in Europe’s path to crisis
Tom Gallagher

the irresponsibility of many financial institutions had not been checked by those regulating the eurozone’s financial affairs. The language of political union and economic governance for the eurozone used by Merkel and Draghi (despite his lack of any kind of political mandate) masked the fact that EU decision-makers had no viable strategy for reviving stricken economies. The financial sector had not become a protected zone of the eurozone overnight. Ever since the passing of the Single European Act in 1986, its perceived needs had come to shape the concerns of EU

in Europe’s path to crisis
Abstract only
Tom Gallagher

of pan-European solutions, was dragging its feet because it wished to exempt many of its own banks from such a regime. 11 EU anti-crisis measures have lacked substance. Often their purpose appears to be to provide sound-bites for the crisis summits held at regular intervals since the spring of 2010, or else position beleaguered leaders to overcome electoral challenges (such as the contest Angela Merkel faced in September 2013). Plans for economic governance of the EU contain bold intentions but they are invariably vague on detail. There is no architecture in place

in Europe’s path to crisis
Tom Gallagher

there was a growing temptation to exaggerate the degree of support for integration. In 2010, Eurobarometer published the findings of a poll in which it was claimed 75 per cent of Europeans were in favour of giving the EU a stronger role in the coordination of member states’ economic and budgetary policies. 111 Respondents had only been asked about inter-governmental cooperation and there was no mention of the role of the EU or the term ‘European economic governance’. The result might have been rather different if this question had been asked instead: ‘Do you think

in Europe’s path to crisis
Tom Gallagher

attracted few of the penalties which normally face decision-makers in the national context. There was no sign that the proponents of a state, already dubbed in some quarters as ‘Euroland’, were capable of obtaining the legitimacy for the sizeable transfers from rich to poorer areas of the currency union without which its continuation is hard to envisage. Support from intellectual elites on the left and business lobbies on the centre-right was not lacking for centralised economic governance. The motives of particular interest groups and lobbies for wishing to transfer

in Europe’s path to crisis
Raj Chari, John Hogan, Gary Murphy, and Michele Crepaz

activity in Ireland spans numerous strands and can be identified on three levels. These are firstly social partnership, where sectional groups, such as trade unions, employers and farmers’ interests, had central roles in the economic governance of the state between 1987 and 2009. Second, there is the issue of cause advocacy where groups attempt to influence policy outcomes in specific areas such as the environment or on questions of morality such as abortion, divorce and same-sex marriage. Finally, there is the case of private lobbying where a feature of policy making in

in Regulating lobbying (second edition)
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Pan-African Philosopher of Democracy and Development
L. Adele Jinadu

relationship between democracy and development as seamless, combining democratic political processes – governance or “soft infrastructures” – with socio-economic arrangements, including “social and physical infrastructures”. These processes and arrangements are designed to protect and promote the freedoms and rights of citizens, as well as advance human development and security through broad-based, state-led allocation and distribution of social surpluses.While the thematic focus on economic governance and management, corporate governance, and socio-economic development

in The Pan-African Pantheon