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Art, process, archaeology

This book presents a study of material images and asks how an appreciation of the making and unfolding of images and art alters archaeological accounts of prehistoric and historic societies. With contributions focusing on case studies including prehistoric Britain, Scandinavia, Iberia, the Americas and Dynastic Egypt, and including contemporary reflections on material images, it makes a novel contribution to ongoing debates relating to archaeological art and images. The book offers a New Materialist analysis of archaeological imagery, with an emphasis on considering the material character of images and their making and unfolding. The book reassesses the predominantly representational paradigm of archaeological image analysis and argues for the importance of considering the ontology of images. It considers images as processes or events and introduces the verb ‘imaging’ to underline the point that images are conditions of possibility that draw together differing aspects of the world. The book is divided into three sections: ‘Emergent images’, which focuses on practices of making; ‘Images as process’, which examines the making and role of images in prehistoric societies; and ‘Unfolding images’, which focuses on how images change as they are made and circulated. The book features contributions from archaeologists, Egyptologists, anthropologists and artists. The contributors to the book highlight the multiple role of images in prehistoric and historic societies, demonstrating that archaeologists need to recognise the dynamic and changeable character of images.

Catherine J. Frieman

This chapter investigates the concept of innovation and its research history across a number of disciplines, from economics to archaeology. It explores how particular conceptualizations of innovation and progress have been tied up in colonial and racist discourse through the case study of colonial and archaeological assessments of Aboriginal Tasmanian culture and technology. The chapter argues that archaeologists, by dint of their training in exploring worlds and social structures not shaped by post-Industrial-Revolution capitalist relations, are particularly well suited to explore the wider question of how and why people innovate (or don’t).

in An archaeology of innovation
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Loomings
Catherine J. Frieman

. Innovation in its most general sense can be understood as any new thing, idea, or practice taken up by a person or people – this is the definition put forward nearly seventy years ago by the anthropologist Homer Barnett ( 1953 , 7). More materially minded writers, whose interests tend to lie in economics or technology studies, treat innovation as a synonym for the development of novel techniques, technologies, or organizational principles; while others separate the actual creation of the new thing or idea (its invention ) from its dissemination and uptake (as an

in An archaeology of innovation
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The museum in the twentieth century
Samuel J.M.M. Alberti

. In setting the chronological parameters of this project, however, I consciously avoided the last decade of the twentieth century, possibly the most significant and certainly the most turbulent decade in the history of the Manchester Museum and UK museums more generally. From 1994 the Heritage Lottery Fund provided a massive financial injection into the museum sector at the millennium, and the New Labour government elected in 1997 shifted the emphasis in museums from free market economics to social inclusion. Capital projects such as Norman Foster’s Great Court at

in Nature and culture
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The widening gyre
Catherine J. Frieman

sociology, economics, and anthropology, we run the risk of uncritically reproducing the social and economic modalities of the last 200 years in Olde Worlde drag. The social world of innovation In order to push back against what I see as a tendency towards overly presentist arguments in archaeological studies of innovation, I have chosen to focus throughout this book on social relationships and social phenomena. The innovation-studies literature – and indeed the wider popular discourse around innovation – is profoundly bound up in common wisdom about social and

in An archaeology of innovation
Jes Wienberg

. The usefulness of the humanities can be asserted in relation to economics, social science, medicine, natural science, and engineering. Motives can be discussed from a philosophy-of-history perspective, with analyses of how different periods viewed usefulness. Accounts of different motives can be presented in textbooks. Justifications that come across as rhetorical slogans for the already initiated may appear in an appeal or at the inauguration of a memorial, a new museum, or a new initiative: The past for the future! History, heritage, and memory as a resource

in Heritopia
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Catherine J. Frieman

kin and community. Formal apprenticeships may emphasize the social difference between master and apprentice, but even here more complex relations may emerge. John Singleton ( 1989 , 22) notes, for example, that even within the strictly hierarchical context of a Japanese master potter’s workshop, the apprentice is like a new bride and their apprenticeship like an adoption into a craft-kinship with their fellow practitioners. The implication here is that the establishment of apprenticeships is not purely a matter of economics or knowledge transmission, but one in

in An archaeology of innovation
Joana Valdez-Tullett

Atlantic Rock Art 111 better understanding of the rock art and avoided unnecessary bias (for details see Valdez-Tullett 2019). Given the sheer amount of data produced, and in order to study Atlantic Rock Art holistically, avoiding hermetic approaches, Network Science methods were used to examine the dataset. The data were studied through a Social Network Analysis (SNA), a formal method of enquiry used in a number of disciplines, from physics to economics, computer science to sociology (Brughmans 2013; Coward 2013; Knappett 2011). Archaeology has increasingly benefited

in Images in the making
Scandinavian Late Iron Age gold foil figures through the lens of intra-action
Ing-Marie Back Danielsson

Economics 34 (1), 91–102. Ingold, T. (2013). Making: Anthropology, Archaeology, Art and Architecture. London and New York: Routledge. Jones, A. and A. Cochrane. (2018). Art and Archaeology. London: Routledge. Jones, A.M., M. Díaz-Guardamino and R.J. Crellin. (2016). ‘From artefact biographies to “multiple objects”: a new analysis of the decorated plaques of the Irish Sea Region’, Norwegian Archaeological Review 49 (2), 113–33. Lamm, J.P. (2004). ‘Figural gold foils found in Sweden: a study based on the discoveries from Helgö’, in H. Clarke and K. Lamm (eds), Excavations

in Images in the making
Fredrik Fahlander

(Mauritania)’, African Archaeological Review 19 (2), 75–118. Hoyer, W. D., D.J. MacInnis, and R. Pieters (2016). Consumer Behavior. Mason, OH: Cengage Learning. Ingold, T. (2010). ‘The textility of making’, Cambridge Journal of Economics 34 (1) 91–102. Ingold, T. (2013). Making: Anthropology, Archaeology, Art and Architecture. London and New York: Routledge. Jackson, M. (2016). Work of Art – Rethinking the Elementary Forms of Religious Life. New York: Columbia University Press. Jones, A. (2006). ‘Animated images: images, agency and landscape in Kilmartin, Argyll’, Journal

in Images in the making