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Violence and Miscegenation in Jean Toomer‘s ‘Blood- Burning Moon’
Allan Borst

Jean Toomer‘s Cane (1923) has long been considered a signature text of both avant-garde Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. While Gothic tropes and imagery lurk throughout Toomer‘s collection of poetry and prose, Anglo-American Gothic conventions come to the foreground in the story ‘Blood-Burning Moon’. The story‘s interracial love triangle provides a locus of conflict between the post-Reconstruction American South and the haunting economic logic of slavery. Though the three characters each aspire to new racial, sexual and economic identities, they are terrorized by a society where employer-employee relations cannot escape the violence of the master-slave dialectic. Toomer does not relinquish his aesthetic experimentation and political radicalism to the Anglo-American Gothic, but instead engages the Gothic form in order to critique the violent racism of American capitalism. In this way, Toomer positions the Gothic centrally within African-American literary and cultural history.

Gothic Studies
Paul Currion

mechanism for generating financial returns, both as an incentive for and an investment in innovation. 2 The end goal of humanitarian innovation should be positive impact on the lives and livelihoods of people affected by crisis, but while ‘[t]he presence of social returns to knowledge investments both through positive externalities and public goods generates an economic rationale for public support for such investments’ ( Frontier Economics, 2014 : 10), such an economic rationale does not exist for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

downturn, rather than problematise informality, developmentalists now praise it as an authentic and valued expression of community mutuality and gender inclusion ( Becker, 2004 ). Through such progressive reinscription, the informal sector has been repackaged through projects like ‘Bottom of the Pyramid’ economics ( Prahalad, 2006 ) or ‘inclusive capitalism’ as an eligible and eager development and business partner. Consider, for example, UNDP’s (2008) homely appraisal of NGO-assisted informality as a low-cost welfare infrastructure for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Gender, Money and Property in the Ghost Stories of Charlotte Riddell
Victoria Margree

This article explores Riddells representational strategies around gender: in particular her male narrators and her female characters made monstrous by money. It argues that Riddell, conscious of social prohibitions on financial knowledge in women, employs male protagonists to subversive effect, installing in her stories a feminine wisdom about the judicious use of wealth. Her narratives identify the Gothic potential of money to dehumanise, foregrounding the culpability of economic arrangements in many of the horrors of her society. While they contain pronounced elements of social critique, they ultimately however defend late-Victorian capitalism by proff ering exemplars of the ethical financial practice by which moneys action is to be kept benign.

Gothic Studies
Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

Introduction All over the globe, fascism, racism and xenophobic nationalism are resurfacing in what we once thought of as ‘respectable’ democracies. Following a particularly bleak weekend at the end of October 2018 (the election of Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, reports of worsening famine in Yemen, Israeli bombardment of Gaza and the murder of eleven worshippers at a refugee-harbouring synagogue in Pittsburgh), my colleague Dr Sara Salem of the London School of Economics tweeted: ‘It’s difficult watching political scientists scrambling to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond and Catia Gregoratti

? Critiquing the Shift from “Smart” to “Smarter Economics” ’, Progress in Development Studies , 16 : 4 , 314 – 28 . Chant , S. and Sweetman , C. ( 2012 ), ‘ Fixing Women or Fixing the World? “Smart Economics”, Efficiency Approaches, and Gender Equality in Development ’, Gender

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Timothy Longman

the genocide. In Sacrifice as Terror , Christopher Taylor explores the logic of sexual violence within Rwandan cultural conceptions of Tutsi beauty and seductiveness ( Taylor, 1999 ). Both Jennie Burnet’s Genocide Lives in Us and Marie Berry’s War, Women, and Power are focused primarily on women in post-genocide Rwanda, but both nevertheless provide greater detail on the experience of women in the genocide that remains consistent with Des Forges’ analysis ( Berry, 2018 ; Burnet, 2013 ). In a series of publications, Philip Verwimp applies the tools of economics

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sean Healy and Victoria Russell

), ‘ Conspiracy Theories ’, Harvard Public Law Working Paper No. 08–03 , University of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 199 , University of Chicago Law & Economics, Olin Working Paper No. 387 , doi: 10.2139/ssrn.1084585 , https://ssrn.com/abstract=1084585 (accessed 7 October 2020 ). Tazzioli

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector
Miriam Bradley

Circulation of the Idea of Distinction in International Law ’ (PhD thesis), London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), http://etheses.lse.ac.uk/3803/ (accessed 3 February 2019) . Taithe , B. ( 2016 ), Danger, Risk, Security and Protection: Concepts at the Heart of the History of Humanitarian Aid ’, in Neuman

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sophie Roborgh

). Mülhausen , M. , Tuck , E. and Zimmerman , H. ( 2017 ), Health Care under Fire: The New Normal ?, London School of Economics and Political Science and Chatham House . Oliver , K. ( 2001 ), Witnessing: Beyond Recognition

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs