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Penelope Lively’s Moon Tiger
Huw Marsh

7 Unlearning empire: Penelope Lively’s Moon Tiger Huw Marsh In the opening lines of Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children (1981), the novel’s narrator, Saleem Sinai, famously describes himself as ‘mysteriously handcuffed to history’, his ‘destinies indissolubly chained to those of [his] country’.1 In the opening lines of Penelope Lively’s Moon Tiger (1987), the novel’s narrator, Claudia Hampton, less famously describes her relationship with the history of her times: ‘The bit of the twentieth century to which I’ve been shackled, willy-nilly, like it or not.’2 In

in End of empire and the English novel since 1945
Joel T. Terranova

Published in 1795, John Palmer, Jun.’s The Haunted Cavern: A Caledonian Tale is a historical Gothic romance that expresses certain unease with the growth of British imperialism at the end of the eighteenth century. In this text, Palmer explores the impact of empire on the colonialized other as well as demonstrating the hypocrisy and abuse of certain imperial practices. With the plot set during the end of the War of the Roses, The Haunted Cavern juxtaposes medieval England as the imperial power with France and Scotland illustrated as the colonialized victims. This article examines the tension towards empire found in The Haunted Cavern which helps clarify the commercialized Gothic romance’s function as a subversive medium towards colonialism.

Gothic Studies

This book explores the history of postwar England during the end of empire through a reading of novels which appeared at the time. Several genres are discussed, including the family saga, travel writing, detective fiction and popular romances. In the mid 1950s, Montagu Slater's brief essay in Arena is the first of a group of contributions, with the authors' warning of a growing American monopoly in cultural expression. Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers and Josephine Tey are now the best remembered representatives of the distaff side of Britain's Golden Age of crime fiction which extended well into the early postwar period. The book focuses on the reception of John Masters' novels, the sequence of novels known as the 'Savage family saga'. William Golding's 'human condition' is very much an English condition, diagnosed amid the historical upheavals of the mid-twentieth century. Popular romance novels were read by thousands throughout Britain and across the world, and can be understood as a constituent element in a postwar colonial discourse. William Boyd's fiction displays a marked alertness to the repercussions of fading imperial grandeur; his A Good Man in Africa, explores the comic possibilities of Kinjanja, a fictional country based on Nigeria. Penelope Lively's tangential approach to writing about empire in Moon Tiger suggests ambivalence and uncertainty about how to represent a colonial past which is both recent and firmly entrenched in ideas of national identity.

Love in a postcolonial climate
Deborah Philips

5 The empire of romance: love in a postcolonial climate Deborah Philips The rose of romance, the internationally recognised logo of the Mills & Boon publishing house, might appear to be a very English rose, but its sales are global and its readership multinational. In 1999, the official historian of the company could write: ‘Ninety years after its founding, Mills & Boon is one of only two British publishers to have become a household name in Britain and throughout the Commonwealth … [it is] a worldwide publishing empire.’1 In 2008, it was estimated that Mills

in End of empire and the English novel since 1945
John McLeod

4 Race, empire and The Swimming-Pool Library John McLeod In ‘Saved by Art’, Alan Hollinghurst shapes a compelling and considered appreciation of the novels of Ronald Firbank. He juxtaposes their baroque, attenuated plots, treasured inconsequentiality and exquisite bon mots with the expansive and forensic writing of Marcel Proust and Henry James. ‘Firbank achieved his highly complex originality’, Hollinghurst writes, ‘not by expansion but by a drastic compression: instead of putting more and more in, he left almost everything out’.1 William Beckwith, the narrator

in Alan Hollinghurst
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Kristen J. Davis

The following considers Richard Marsh’s 1897 gothic novel The Beetle in relation to fin-de-siècle anxieties, specifically sexual deviancy, empire, and venereal disease. While the domestic Contagious Diseases Acts had been revealed in the 1880s, continued high rates of VD amongst British soldiers in particular continued the debate as to who was responsible for spreading diseases such as syphilis both at home and abroad. At a time of ‘colonial syphiliphobia’, to extend Showalter’s term, The Beetle suggests the necessity of regulating venereal disease in the Empire to protect Britain’s ‘racial superiority’ and conservatively warns against the potential consequences of dabbling with the sexually ‘deviant’ and dangerous Orient.

Gothic Studies