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Wider still and wider
Author: Ben Wellings

English nationalism, Brexit and the Anglosphere is the first sustained research that examines the inter-relationships between English nationalism, Brexit and the Anglosphere. Much initial analysis of Brexit concentrated on the revolt of those ‘left behind’ by globalisation. English nationalism, Brexit and the Anglosphere analyses the elite project behind Brexit. This project was framed within the political traditions of an expansive English nationalism. Far from being parochial ‘Little Englanders’, elite Brexiteers sought to lessen the rupture of leaving the European Union by suggesting a return to trade and security alliances with ‘true friends’ and ‘traditional allies’ in the Anglosphere. Brexit was thus reassuringly presented as a giant leap into the known. Legitimising this far-reaching change in British and European politics required the re-articulation of a globally oriented Englishness. This politicised Englishness was underpinned by arguments about the United Kingdom’s imperial past and its global future advanced as a critique of its European present. When framing the UK’s EU membership as a European interregnum followed by a global restoration, Brexiteers both invoked and occluded England by asserting the wider categories of belonging that inform contemporary English nationalism.

Bill Jones

seen as very much the last resort. European balance of power Traditionally, Britain has sought to maintain a stable balance of power on the continent of Europe for fear that a dominant power would threaten its economic interests and ultimately harbour thoughts of invasion. So, it followed that Britain found itself siding against France when it was dominant and then Germany when that country assumed the dominant role. Empire and decline Given the familiarity with seafaring, it was natural that British ships should take a lead in exploring the world in the

in British politics today
Abstract only
England’s wider categories of belonging
Ben Wellings

’s commemorative time and energy went towards commemorating the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade within the British Empire. The centrepiece of commemorative events was the ceremony at Westminster Abbey in August, which was most notable for the incursion by Toyin Agbetu who made his protest so close to the person of the Queen. There are several explanations for the elision of the tercentenary of the Union between England and Scotland by the bicentenary of the abolition of slavery. The first was that for an external audience the abolition of slavery was a

in English nationalism, Brexit and the Anglosphere
Peter Barry

Background Postcolonial criticism emerged as a distinct category only in the 1990s. It is not mentioned, for instance, in the first edition of Selden's A Reader's Guide to Contemporary Literary Theory (1985) or Jeremy Hawthorn's A Concise Glossary of Contemporary Literary Theory (1992). It gained currency through the influence of such books as In Other Worlds (Gayatri Spivak, 1987); The Empire Writes Back (Bill Ashcroft, 1989); Nation and Narration (Homi Bhabha, 1990) and Culture and Imperialism (Edward Said, 1993). An important collection of

in Beginning theory (fourth edition)
Zheng Yangwen

Heaven. It also helps students navigate the growing debate and scholarship on these conflicts. ‘The Age of Empire’: From Vietnam to Korea 2 China had been the dominant empire in Asia since the founding of the Middle Kingdom in 221 BC . Trade with China had never been a matter of commercial transaction; it had always been a form of diplomacy, which had included tributes. The Middle Kingdom treated its small neighbours as vassals and their territory as its sphere of influence; that is why the Lord Macartney embassy was categorised by the Qing court

in Ten Lessons in Modern Chinese History
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Ethics and literary theory
Edward Tomarken

Nussbaum begins by analysing the limitations of the two prevalent ethical theories, those of Kant and Bentham. My analysis of My Week with Marilyn and Downton Abbey serves to clarify this argument. The alternative Nussbaum recommends involves: (1) an interpretation, with the emphasis on ‘an’ rather than ‘the’, as exemplified in the discussion of The Artist and Boardwalk Empire ; (2) feelings and correct judgement in relation to The Help and Weeds . Martha Nussbaum, Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and

in Why theory?
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John McLeod

with a history of colonialism. In addition, we will reconsider our approaches to older, more familiar or canonical works that seem to have little to do with the fortunes of Empire. By the end of this book you will have encountered many new concepts which will help you build and develop your readings of the range of texts which preoccupy postcolonialism. Along the way, you will be continually invited to think critically about the key concepts in the field, and measure your own satisfaction with the different strands of thought which inhabit and shape postcolonial

in Beginning postcolonialism (second edition)
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Daniel Szechi

the procedure. All historians can do is interpret the maddeningly imprecise data that has survived the vicissitudes of time. Nevertheless, Jacobitism’s power to generate ‘what-ifs’ is thought-provoking. The subject is one on which many other events in British history, such as the creation of a stable polity, the union of Scotland and England, the onset of the industrial revolution, the rise of the first British empire, and so on, have been argued to hinge. This tantalising sense that Jacobitism had the potential to make the history of Britain turn out very

in The Jacobites (second edition)
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National traditions and political dilemmas
Ben Wellings

Edward II (subsequently endorsed by Pope John XXII in 1328), yet the Treaty of Union subsumed Scottish independence in 1707 and thereafter. Until the growth in support for secessionism in the 2000s, Scottish nationalism was characterised by an active participation within the structures and activities of the British state and Empire, leavened with a high degree of autonomy concerning the governance of Scotland itself. Despite such complications, these two models of nationalism – independence and a transformative revolutionary moment – created important models

in English nationalism, Brexit and the Anglosphere
Bill Jones

and state; in the seventeenth century, conflict between king and Parliament was settled in the form of a limited monarchy; while the nineteenth century saw the gradual expansion of the franchise, to include all classes of voters by the early twentieth century. Empire . This, arguably unjustifiable, centuries-long adventure proved hugely popular for a nation with a strong maritime tradition. Thousands flocked to live in the new colonies and enjoy a standard of life much higher than back home. Moreover, the British tended to exult in their status as the centre of a

in British politics today