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Gender, sexual difference and knowledge in Bacon’s New Atlantis
Kate Aughterson

temples’ (The Discovery of … Guiana, London, 1595, fo.99). New World land usually signified an invitation to possession: gender is used both to convey and justify this signification, and to justify a gendered, racial and epistemological hierarchy. See Richard Burt and J. Archer (eds), Enclosure Acts: Sexuality, Property and Culture in Early Modern England (Ithaca, Cornell University Press, 1993); Annette Kolodny, The Lay of the Land: Metaphor as Experience and History in American Life and Letters (Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 1975); Peter Mason

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
Steve Sohmer

reprieve. 11 Charles Ripley Gillett, Burned Books: Neglected Chapters in English History and Literature , 2 vols (New York: Columbia University Press, 1932 ), I.90; Lynda Boose, ‘The 1599 Bishops’ Ban and Renaissance Pornography’, in Richard Burt and John Michael Archer, eds, Enclosure Acts

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Positive, negative, and political affects in Shakespeare’s first tetralogy
Paul Joseph Zajac

peasants: status, genre, and the representation of rebellion’, Representations 1 (1983), 1–29 (pp. 23–5); Thomas Cartelli, ‘Jack Cade in the Garden: Class Consciousness and Class Conflict in 2 Henry VI ’, in Richard Burt and John Michael Archer (eds), Enclosure Acts: Sexuality, Property, and Culture in Early Modern England (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994), pp. 48–67; Elyssa Y. Cheng, ‘Disputing boundaries: space and social boundary in 2 Henry VI ’, Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies 34, no. 1 (2008), 185–201; and Simon C. Estok, Ecocriticism and

in Positive emotions in early modern literature and culture
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The Revenger’s Tragedy
Gabriel A. Rieger

Sexualization of the Jacobean Stage’, in Richard Burt and John Michael Archer (eds), Enclosure Acts: Sexuality, Property and Culture in Early Modern England (Ithaca: Cornel Universty Press, 1994), pp. 185–200 (p. 197). 18 Ibid ., p. 198. 19 See also MacDonald Jackson's introduction to The Revenger’s Tragedy in The Collected Works of Thomas Middleton , ed. Gary Taylor and John Lavagnino (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007), pp. 543–7 (p. 543). All subsequent quotations from The Revenger’s Tragedy are taken from this

in The genres of Renaissance tragedy
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Vincent Quinn

In class-riven Britain it is a short step from ‘common or garden’ to ‘common as muck’. Before the enclosure acts of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the ‘common land’ supported ‘the common people’ who held the nation’s resources ‘in common’. From this we derive the concept of ‘common weal’ or ‘common wealth’ – hence the ‘Commonwealth’ governed by Oliver Cromwell. Skipping forward three hundred years, Britain’s postimperial ‘Commonwealth of Nations’ is a different beast from Cromwell’s, not least because it was established by a monarch. The

in Reading
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Sermon contexts for Spenser’s Book VI
Margaret Christian

possibilities, and “Court and country” or “City, Court, and country” for “everywhere.” 2 I like Michael C. Schoenfeldt’s formulation that “the entire world of the shepherds [is] a projection of the court in miniature” (“The Poetry of Conduct: Accommodation and Transgression in TFQ, Book 6,” in Enclosure Acts:  Sexuality, Property, and Culture in Early Modern England, ed. Richard Burt and John Michael Archer [Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1994], 151–69), 156. 179 Sermon contexts for Spenser’s Book VI 179 The time was once, in my first prime of yeares,   When pride

in Spenserian allegory and Elizabethan biblical exegesis
Shakespeare, Harington and onomastic scatology
Peter J. Smith

Pipe: Water Supply, Incontinent Sources, and the Leaky Body Politic’, in Richard Burt and John Michael Archer (eds), Enclosure Acts: Sexuality, Property, and Culture in Early Modern England (Cornell University Press: Ithaca and London, 1994 ), 203–28, p. 210. 52 Pleasure Reconciled To

in Between two stools