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James Pereiro

Henry Edward Manning (1808–92) was involved in some of the most pressing social issues of his time, from the defence of workers and trade unionism to finding a solution for the dock strike and the education of the poor. English Catholic social conscience, as a whole and with some singular exceptions, was somewhat slow in following the leadership of the cardinal in some of these matters. This article studies a barely known aspect of Manning’s social activity: his involvement in the British response to the Russian pogroms of 1881–82 and in other contemporary Jewish issues.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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Carmen M. Mangion

6 7 Edward R. Norman, The English Catholic Church in the Nineteenth Century (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984), p. 2. Robert J. Klaus, The Pope, the Protestants, and the Irish: Papal Aggression and Anti-Catholicism in Mid-Nineteenth Century England (London: Garland Publishing, 1987), p. 228. On 29 September 1850, Pope Pius IX reestablished the English Catholic hierarchy, a canonical form of church government which included a hierarchy of bishops who had episcopal authority over clergy and laity. Frank H. Wallis, Popular Anti-Catholicism in Mid

in Contested identities
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Carmen M. Mangion

the evangelisation of Catholics. Women religious conceived of their authority in terms of mission. Power was exercised in the convent, guided by an accepted organisational structure, often set down in writing and democratic in some ways. By the end of the nineteenth century, women’s congregations were an organised, centralised, standardised, bureaucratic entity whose mission was focused, whose functions were regularised, and which had a specific place in English Catholic social life. Yet women religious embodied the Victorian ideal of femininity. They believed and

in Contested identities
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Carmen M. Mangion

English Catholic Church lacked the funds to develop the requisite number of Catholic educational institutions, which meant that the Catholic 18 H. Byerley Thomson, The Choice of a Profession: A Concise Account and Comparative Review of the English Professions (London: Chapman and Hall, 1857), pp. 1–2. 19 Holcombe, 1973, p. 19. 20 On 29 September 1850, Pope Pius IX re-established the English Catholic hierarchy, the canonical form of church government which included a hierarchy of bishops and archbishops who had episcopal authority over clergy and laity. See Chapter 1

in Contested identities
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Carmen M. Mangion

C. Lutkehaus, eds, Gendered Missions: Women and Men in Missionary Discourse and Practice (Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 1999). 15 Rhonda A. Semple, Missionary Women: Gender, Professionalism and the Victorian Idea of Christian Mission (Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2003), p. 2. This text, like so many others in its genre, is based on Protestant missionary efforts. Historiography on nineteenth-century English Catholic women involved in overseas missionary work is sparse. The references to overseas missionary work by women religious tend to be

in Contested identities
David Geiringer

behaviour and beliefs. However, the intention of the project was never to classify the beliefs of individual women along class or any other lines in a manner akin to that of Hornsby-Smith. A comprehensive commentary on the variations between groupings such as ‘cradle Catholics’ and converts, Irish immigrants and English Catholics has been attempted before. 7 The way these variants shaped Catholic

in The Pope and the pill
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Carmen Mangion

, particularly those associated with the Second Vatican Council and its reception in England. 78 Jay P. Corrin’s Catholic Progressives in England after Vatican II (2013) offers a much-needed spotlight on the Catholic left. 79 David Geiringer’s interventions on post-war Catholic religious change suggest that Church authorities and Catholic laity engaged with secular ideas and recategorisation of certain religious beliefs. 80 Alana Harris’s work on post-war Catholicism and the family utilises ‘lived experience’ to explore the continuity within English Catholic cultures of

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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David Geiringer

Vatican II caused this ‘mass exodus’ from the Church – ‘Did the Council Fail?’ its epilogue asks. 21 Catholic commentators of both a liberal and orthodox persuasion have interpreted the middle of the 1960s as something of a historical watershed for English Catholics, be that as a point of modernising progression or regression away from an apparent ‘golden age’. Margaret’s reflections epitomised this

in The Pope and the pill
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David Geiringer

in continental Europe and North America would mirror the larger geographical platforms with which advocates of a ‘sexual revolution’ thesis, such as Brown and Marwick, have engaged. 20 Nevertheless, it must be reiterated that the changes outlined here can claim to be to representative only of an English Catholic experience. Furthermore, it was a particular Catholic experience. Lodge’s allusion to an

in The Pope and the pill
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Carmen M. Mangion

then the enactment of the 1829 Catholic Emancipation Act made conventual life, and in particular the growth of female active, simple-vowed congregations, a viable possibility in England.13 English women no longer had to travel to the continent to become nuns, and religious life was no longer the exclusive purview of the English Catholic elite. The development and dramatic growth of women’s simplevowed, active congregations expanded the boundaries of religious life by expanding the base of Catholic women who could become women religious. And this cohort of Catholic

in Contested identities