Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • "English Catholics" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Entrepreneurs and professionals
John Herson

with Irish compatriots and their work in a Church with roots in the English Catholic community. The Gibson family: from Ulster to the mayoral chamber Hugh Woods Gibson was the most ‘successful’ Irish immigrant to settle in nineteenth-century Stafford. His case demonstrates that religious links between Ulster and England could play a significant role in establishing Protestant immigrants in the host economy, but it also cautions against making simple assumptions about the attitudes and behaviour patterns inculcated by an Ulster Presbyterian background. Gibson and his

in Divergent paths
Bryan Fanning

, Benson had imagined a future world dominated since 1917 by socialism, freemasonry and secular science. In this future, England had assented to Catholic home rule in Ireland and encouraged its Catholic population to emigrate there. Catholicism had declined everywhere except in Rome and in Ireland where appearances of a woman in blue were reported at Marian shrines.1 The ideas behind Benson’s respective utopia and dystopia were in keeping with wider Catholic intellectual responses to the threat of modernity. English Catholics like Benson and Hillaire Belloc viewed the

in Are the Irish different?
Societies, cultures and ideologies

Migrations of people, ideas, beliefs and cultures have closely shaped relations between the nations of the British and Irish Isles. In part this was the result of Anglo-imperialism, which expanded from a heartland around London and the South of England, first, then through the ‘Celtic fringe’, creating hybrid peoples who were both Irish and British, before spreading across the globe. At times, Catholics of both islands were exiled from this narrative of nation-building. Political pressures, economic opportunities, a spirit of adventure and sometimes force, spurred the creation of multiple diasporas from the British and Irish Isles. This book brings together a range of leading scholars who explore the origins, varieties and extent of these diasporas.

Wherever Britons and the Irish went, they created new identities as neo-Britons, neo-Angles, neo-Irish, neo-Scots: persons who were colonials, new nationals, and yet still linked to their old country and home nations. British and Irish emigrants also perpetuated elements of their distinctive national cultures in music, literature, saints’ days and broader, diffuse interactions with fellow nationals.

These especially commissioned essays explore processes of diaspora-formation from the English Catholic exiles of the sixteenth century, through the ‘Wild Geese’, Jacobites, traders and servants of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, to the modern colonising diasporas associated with the modern age of mass migration.

Religion, persecution and identity in Britain and Ireland, 1558–1794
J.C.D. Clark

. There were many, many more; and they had proliferated. ‘From about ten English Catholic houses on the continent at the beginning of the seventeenth century there were a hundred or so fifty years later. Additionally, there were about forty Irish Catholic foundations and a dozen Scottish.’5 They constituted a communications network, dedicated to a cause that was at once both religious and political. 22 british and irish diasporas Lady Lucy Herbert thus united in her person several key diasporic themes: an elite family, used to leadership roles, that had suffered in

in British and Irish diasporas
Abstract only
British and Irish diasporas: societies, cultures and ideologies
Donald M. MacRaild, Tanja Bueltmann, and J.C.D. Clark

personal danger if they did not flee repression. At varying times, the harshest possible punishments hung over English Catholics and Protestants, Irish and Scottish Jacobites, United Irishmen and Jacobin radicals. The extent of their victimhood should not be exaggerated over the long duration, but neither should it be ignored. In addressing these and other issues, we attempt to complicate the picture of diaspora-formation by addressing early modern religious and military diasporas on the continent, as well as seaborne settlements in North America and beyond. In so doing

in British and Irish diasporas
Abstract only
Labouring families before the Famine
John Herson

Prestwich in 1883.7 John and Eliza Kearns depended on occupations at the margins of the economy, but Eliza had aspirations and the family managed to achieve a modest respectability with their children showing clear evidence of upward social mobility. The evidence suggests they grew up in an English Catholic environment in which their often-absent father’s Irish identity had little significance. Descendants of the family consistently married non-Irish people and the family’s Irish heritage was rapidly diluted. Their trajectory contrasts markedly with that of Farrell and

in Divergent paths
Bryan Fanning

secular science. In this future, England had assented to Catholic home rule in Ireland and encouraged its Catholic population to emigrate there. Catholicism had declined everywhere except in Rome and in Ireland, where appearances of a woman in blue were reported at Marian shrines.1 The ideas behind Benson’s respective utopia and dystopia were in keeping with wider Catholic intellectual responses to the threat of modernity. English Catholics like Benson and Hillaire Belloc viewed the survival of Catholicism in post-Reformation Ireland as a historical miracle. Ireland

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Negotiating religious selfhoods in post-1945 England
Barry Hazley

corrupting temptations of modern life. 21 If the immigrant quarter confronted migrants with a multitude of moral dangers, their capacity to navigate this environment was hampered by the behavioural consequences of a defective system of moral socialisation, itself a reflection of the untrammelled power of the Irish Church in an underdeveloped rural society. 22 Catholic constructions of the Irish migrant, particularly those formulated by English Catholic social scientists and the English hierarchy, thus inscribed the migrant experience within a wider discourse of social

in Life history and the Irish migrant experience in post-war England
John Herson

one particular part of town but this did not mean they sought out, or remained trapped in, a purely Irish support network. On the contrary, members of this family engaged rapidly with native Staffordians, and descendants intermarried with people from the host society. It seems clear that for most in the Coleman family Irish identity was fairly rapidly transmuted into a respectable English Catholic one. As one descendant said in an interview, ‘the first immigrants looked to home, the second generation looked both ways and the third generation said “forget it”’.11

in Divergent paths
John Herson

were present in the town for over 110 years. We see here a family that retained, and indeed promoted, a strong identification with Catholicism, but whose ethnic Irish identity was rapidly transmuted into an English Catholic one. That process began with John Cronin’s career in the army, and was enhanced by his marriage and the family’s evolution in Stafford. Their case illustrates how service in the forces could open up opportunities to Irish emigrants, but only if they were prepared to sacrifice any residual commitment to an active Irish identity. A railwayman

in Divergent paths