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England’s altered confidence
Anne Sweeney

bereaved Catholics of what St Bernard called the ‘martyrdom of the heart’, harder to bear even than bodily martyrdom. 5 If this is also an account of the mood of English Catholics such as Byrd, as Southwell found them, they are an unhappy company indeed; the music of such men was indeed full of complaint and sadness: perfectly natural in the circumstances, Southwell suggests. The

in Robert Southwell
James Doelman

Gunpowder Plot, it becomes a digressive satire on Garnet and those English Catholics who venerated him. The elegy harshly redirects attention to the execution itself, that his ‘hed & face appeared in Hempe’, that is, the noose. After the digression, the poet returns his attention to the English priest that his poem celebrates. He now explicitly rejects the Catholic formulae of legends and recorded miracles

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy
John Derricke versus Edmund Spenser
Brian C. Lockey

Catholic subjects – especially those in Ireland – wanted to restore papal supremacy. As Arthur Marotti and W.K. Jordan have argued, English Roman Catholics were mostly insincere when they advocated for religious toleration within the kingdoms governed by the Crown. Even when English Catholics were making a case for religious toleration, their true motive, according to Jordan, was to restore papal supremacy and traditional spiritual oversight of the temporal realm. 33 Thus in terms of Derricke’s reference to Irish

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Funeral elegies on churchmen and scholars
James Doelman

two editions included ‘the retraction of the libeller’: Thomas Preston, a Benedictine monk who had long sought to reconcile English Catholics with King James, was the priest who had reputedly converted the Bishop to the Catholic Church on his deathbed; however, late in 1621 he retracted those statements. 52 The sermon itself charges that the Roman Church made a practice of such supposed conversions, rehearsing their

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy
Imagining union in early Jacobean panegyric
Christopher Ivic

and national identity in the writings of English Catholics in the early modern period, see Highley, Catholics Writing the Nation . 192 Jonson, The Workes of Beniamin Jonson , 778. The same day that Jonson delivered his Panegyre to James, the king dismissively referred to Catholics as ‘a priuate Sect, lurking within the bowels of this Nation’, and he admonished Catholics that ‘they presume not so much vpon my Lenitie’: [James VI and I], The Kings Maiesties Speech , B4 r , C2 v . 193 Ian Donaldson, Ben Jonson: a life (Oxford: Oxford University Press

in The subject of Britain, 1603–25

Ralph Knevet's Supplement of the Faery Queene (1635) is a narrative and allegorical work, which weaves together a complex collection of tales and episodes, featuring knights, ladies, sorcerers, monsters, vertiginous fortresses and deadly battles – a chivalric romp in Spenser's cod medieval style. The poem shadows recent English history, and the major military and political events of the Thirty Years War. But the Supplement is also an ambitiously intertextual poem, weaving together materials from mythic, literary, historical, scientific, theological, and many other kinds of written sources. Its encyclopaedic ambitions combine with Knevet's historical focus to produce an allegorical epic poem of considerable interest and power.

This new edition of Knevet's Supplement, the first scholarly text of the poem ever published, situates it in its literary, historical, biographical, and intellectual contexts. An extensive introduction and copious critical commentary, positioned at the back of the book, will enable students and scholars alike to access Knevet's complicated and enigmatic meanings, structures, and allusions.

Anne Sweeney

Verstegan in Antwerp, detailing the increased torturing of Catholic prisoners to raise awareness abroad of the desperate need of the English Catholics. 4 He had used almost the same words to engage the heart of Britannia as to raise anger against her in the hearts of her enemies abroad. In the private as in the public sphere, Southwell seemed to be struggling against the current. He had arrived in England

in Robert Southwell
Into England
Anne Sweeney

; but who was Weston’s superior, and what was his agenda? This was becoming a confused picture. Cardinal Allen, the only senior Englishman in episcopal orders now able to speak for the English Catholics in Rome, was given faculties as ‘Prefect of the English Mission’, in 1581. Although subject to the Cardinal Protector in Rome, he was effectively the ecclesiastical superior until his death in 1594

in Robert Southwell
Abstract only
The thought of the outside in Shakespeare’s histories
Richard Wilson

of Anne, chimes with the attitude of Catholic exiles on hearing that ‘England expects a new Queen and another Cecil’. 27 The ‘Lady’ wooed by ‘the Toad’ was Arbella Stuart, neice of Mary Queen of Scots and the next-best hope of English Catholics after Ferdinando. ‘Sir R. Cecil intends to be King by marrying Arabella and now lacks only the name

in Shakespeare’s histories and counter-histories
Abstract only
Ben Jonson’s admiration for Southwell’s ‘burning Babe’
Anne Sweeney

Pope had declared Elizabeth excommunicate six years earlier, and given English Catholics permission to consider her overthrow. 13 It therefore might be expected that those hoping for preferment at Court would be more than usually anxious to dissemble any family Catholicism. Despite this, and despite even the fact that his father was at that moment in Marshalsea prison accused of speaking against the

in Robert Southwell