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Anna Siebach Larsen

of the beleaguered and exiled English Catholic community. Through More’s textual sanctification, the early hagio-biographers sought to create a virtual, textual locus for their now-exiled co-religionists to orient and ground themselves within a rapidly shifting religious and intellectual climate. CONTZEN 9780719089701 PRINT (MAD0059) (G).indd 220 01/12/2014 15:34 Reforming grammar Humanist sanctity of sanctity 221 Notes   1 Nicholas Harpsfield, The Life and Death of Sir Thomas Moore, Knight, ed. Elsie Vaughan Hitchcock, EETS O.S. 186 (London: Oxford

in Sanctity as literature in late medieval Britain
Monika Fludernik

English Catholics was its appropriation of English medieval saints from the Legenda aurea for the construction of a history of the Christian religion which eliminated the papacy from the historical record. Foxe relied on John Bale for such a ‘non-Roman, non-papal foundation’  21 of the history of the British (Protestant) Church, with its subtle nationalist revision of Catholic ( kat-holic ) notions of martyrdom. 22 For British Catholics, this new orthodoxy of the

in Enacting the Bible in medieval and early modern drama
Abstract only
Ye goon to … Hereford? Regional devotion and England’s other St Thomas
Daniel Birkholz

in seeking to ascertain its place. Postscript No Life of St Thomas Cantilupe survives before two extant from the 1670s. One of these, by the expatriate English Jesuit Richard Strange (a rector in Ghent), directs itself towards a displaced ‘English Catholic community on the continent’, while the other (folded into a county history) is by Herefordshire antiquarian Thomas Blount, who is ‘not known to have travelled abroad’. 103 These two lives ‘[do not] contradict one another’, agreeing in outline and basic elements, but they do ‘differ in spatial references

in Harley manuscript geographies
Joshua Davies

describes as the ‘marvellous speed’ with which it spread ‘throughout the whole of England’. To use Fradenburg’s words, the cross enables ‘the crossing-​over of difference into identity, the unfamiliar into the familiar’. But this was not a seamless process. Indeed, shortly after the unveiling of the cross Granville’s sister, Lady Georgiana, felt it necessary to explain to the Journal of Rome that the cross was not erected by the English Catholic community but her brother, ‘one of their Protestant countrymen’, and her remarks were considered significant enough to be

in Visions and ruins