Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 116 items for :

  • "Ethnicity" x
  • Manchester History of Medicine x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Doltomania
Richard Bates

intended not only to help individuals, but to improve the overall psychological health of the French nation – or, as she revealingly referred to it, the French ‘ ethnie ’ (race or ethnic group). She assumed an overwhelmingly white and culturally Catholic audience. She did not foreground the voices of people on the margins of French society or particularly seek to appeal to immigrant communities; working-class and immigrant areas were underrepresented in her mailbag. Her thinking was shaped in an era and a milieu that took for

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
Dolto, psychoanalysis and Catholicism from Occupation to Liberation
Richard Bates

holistic medicine and psychological education in a hospital setting, with working-class patients, she would have understood herself to be working to improve the physical, mental and moral health of the French race, in the spirit of the National Revolution. As she stated in a much later interview, ‘doing psychoanalysis is to be at the service of people who live in the same time as me, who are from the ethnicity [ ethnie ] as me’. 47 In this way, though her ideas were not inseparably wedded to the Pétainist vision, they aligned

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
Abstract only
Psychoanalysis in the public sphere, 1968–88
Richard Bates

the time, as shown in Chapter 3 . While her published vision in La Cause des enfants avoided Vichy’s overtly national-racial aspects, her private correspondence hinted at a concern for France’s national and ethnic future if education were not reformed. In one 1970 letter she wrote of a ‘sort of generalized septicaemia of the French, who appear like an organism afflicted with an obsessive neurosis’. This affliction she attributed to ‘French institutions [which] have created petty and lazy minds. I don’t see how our

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
The role of country of origin
Brendan D. Kelly

admission? Overall, research from countries other than Ireland suggests that being a member of a non-­majority ethnic group increases risk of involuntary detention and treatment. In New Zealand, DONNELLY 9780719099465 PRINT.indd 196 12/10/2015 15:59 Psychiatric admission in Ireland 197 involuntary admission is associated with Maori rather than European ethnicity (Wheeler et al., 2005). In Switzerland, involuntary admission is associated with being a ‘foreign national’, even after controlling for gender, age, diagnosis and severity of mental disorder (Lay et al., 2011

in Ethical and legal debates in Irish healthcare
Abstract only
Clement Masakure

divisions. Hence, relationships of domination and subordination were not just a result of inequalities between different races and classes in South Africa; there were also inequalities among men and women, and white, coloured and black women. 24 According to Marks, power relations ‘were made more complex by racial, ethnic and class divisions within the profession while the form that professionalism took reinforced racial and class cleavages’. 25 Rhodesian clinical spaces followed a similar trajectory with a fractured sisterhood informed by race and class

in African nurses and everyday work in twentieth-century Zimbabwe
Suriname under Dutch rule, 1750– 1950

Explaining how leprosy was considered in various historical settings by referring to categories of uncleanliness in antiquity, is problematic. The book historicizes how leprosy has been framed and addressed. It investigates the history of leprosy in Suriname, a plantation society where the vast majority of the population consisted of imported slaves from Africa. The relationship between the modern stigmatization and exclusion of people affected with leprosy, and the political tensions and racial fears originating in colonial slave society, exerting their influence until after the decolonization up to the present day. The book explores leprosy management on the black side of the medical market in the age of slavery as contrasted with the white side. The difference in perspectives on leprosy between African slaves and European masters contributed to the development of the 'Great Confinement' policies, and leprosy sufferers were sent to the Batavia leprosy asylum. Dutch debates about leprosy took place when the threat of a 'return' of leprosy to the Netherlands appeared to materialise. A symbiotic alliance for leprosy care that had formed between the colonial state and the Catholics earlier in the nineteenth century was renegotiated within the transforming landscape of Surinamese society to incorporate Protestants as well. By 1935, Dutch colonial medicine had dammed the growing danger of leprosy by using the modern policies of detection and treatment. Dutch doctors and public health officials tried to come to grips with the Afro-Surinamese belief in treef and its influence on the execution of public health policies.

Space, identity and power

This volume aims to disclose the political, social and cultural factors that influenced the sanitary measures against epidemics developed in the Mediterranean during the long nineteenth century. The contributions to the book provide new interdisciplinary insights to the booming field of ‘quarantine studies’ through a systematic use of the analytic categories of space, identity and power. The ultimate goal is to show the multidimensional nature of quarantine, the intimate links that sanitary administrations and institutions had with the territorial organization of states, international trade, the construction of national, colonial, religious and professional identities or the configuration of political regimes. The circum-Mediterranean geographical spread of the case studies contained in this volume illuminates the similarities and differences around and across this sea, on the southern and northern shores, in Arabic, Spanish, Portuguese, Greek, Italian, English and French-speaking domains. At the same time, it is highly interested in engaging in the global English-speaking community, offering a wide range of terms, sources, bibliography, interpretative tools and views produced and elaborated in various Mediterranean countries. The historical approach will be useful to recognize the secular tensions that still lie behind present-day issues such as the return of epidemics or the global flows of migrants and refugees.

Author: Alannah Tomkins

Victorian medical men could suffer numerous setbacks on their individual paths to professionalisation, and Thomas Elkanah Hoyle's career offers a telling exemplar. This book addresses a range of the financial, professional, and personal challenges that faced and sometimes defeated the aspiring medical men of England and Wales. Spanning the decades 1780-1890, from the publication of the first medical directory to the second Medical Registration Act, it considers their careers in England and Wales, and in the Indian Medical Service. The book questions the existing picture of broad and rising medical prosperity across the nineteenth century to consider the men who did not keep up with professionalising trends. Financial difficulty was widespread in medical practice, and while there are only a few who underwent bankruptcy or insolvency identified among medical suicides, the fear of financial failure could prove a powerful motive for self-destruction. The book unpicks the life stories of men such as Henry Edwards, who could not sustain a professional persona of disinterested expertise. In doing so it uncovers the trials of the medical marketplace and the pressures of medical masculinity. The book also considers charges against practitioners that entailed their neglect, incompetence or questionable practice which occasioned a threat to patients' lives. The occurrence and reporting of violent crime by medical men, specifically serious sexual assault and murder is also discussed. A tiny proportion of medical practitioners also experienced life as a patient in an asylum.

Julian M. Simpson

development of the NHS. There is ample evidence that much discrimination was linked to ethnicity. The undoubted existence of racism does not however explain all of the historical dynamics involved when it comes to the history of South Asian doctors in general practice in the NHS. Memmi’s distinction between the complementary concepts of racism and heterophobia supports an exploration of the NHS as being historically the product of discrimination based on perceived racial differences but also on difference in a wider sense.4 Memmi argues for the need to separately consider

in Migrant architects of the NHS
Memories of practice on the periphery
Julian M. Simpson

offers an examination of the nature of the relationship between South Asian doctors and ethnic minority patients. I conclude by outlining the problematic nature of the disengagement of the mainstream of British medicine from large parts of Britain and the resulting dependency 182 182 Shaping British medicine and society of particular populations on migrant doctors who were themselves frequently professionally marginalised. Embracing ‘dirty work’; finding common ground If entering general practice was a logical option to pursue for practitioners who found

in Migrant architects of the NHS