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Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

as to assure – were that even desirable – the standardisation objectivity would require. The circumstances under which they take place are, like the personal relationships between the individuals involved, highly variable. Intersubjectivity  – the meeting of subjectivities in the interview space – has become increasingly important in oral history research, with researchers trying to understand how differences in class, race and ethnicity, gender and status affect the process of interviewing and shape the interview content.23 A  known instability is at the heart of

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Kosovo prior to 1999
Naomi Head

opportunities for dialogue during the 1990s in Kosovo. The second half of the story is told in Chapter 6 where a theoretical account of communicative ethics is applied to the empirical communicative practices through which the justifications for the use of force were offered. The first section challenges the essentialist ethnic assumption which underpins some interpretations of the

in Justifying violence
Abstract only
Bernadette C. Hayes
and
Ian McAllister

The post-cold war era has witnessed a proliferation of intrastate conflicts based on ethnic differences. Intrastate conflicts, or civil wars, have now replaced interstate conflicts, or international wars, as the most prevalent and deadliest form of violence in the international system today (Wallensteen, 2012 ). Currently, 95 per cent of wars are civil wars, and the large

in Conflict to peace
Lee Jarvis
and
Michael Lister

demonstrated below, for some – generally (but not exclusively) white individuals – this impact is limited. Others – primarily, but not exclusively, ethnic minority participants – noted a significant attenuation of citizenship in these areas. The second key finding is that, whilst an overall pattern emerges in our research of citizenship erosion amongst individuals identifying as ethnic minority in particular

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Abstract only
Bernadette C. Hayes
and
Ian McAllister

Competing identities within nation states are commonplace in the modern world. Only about 1 in 10 of today’s nation states is ethnically homogeneous (Haymes, 1997 ), leaving considerable scope for ethnic political conflict. Since 1990, ethnonationalist conflict has been particularly intense in the postcommunist states of eastern Europe and central Asia, where ethnic divisions have provided an

in Conflict to peace
Anti-terrorism powers and vernacular (in)securities
Lee Jarvis
and
Michael Lister

) – many people were keen to share their own experiences of racial or religious inequality and the personal insecurities these engendered. Such experiences were especially prominent in encounters with institutional or other barriers to formal employment. As one female put it: ‘It’s very difficult to access jobs if you are from the ethnic minority ... I’ve experienced it all the time, even if you’re talking

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Abstract only
Adrian Millar

Introduction The preceding analysis demonstrates that the dynamics of the conflict in Northern Ireland are more than simply a matter of two ethnic groups suffering from constitutional and political insecurity that causes them to clash over their different national aspirations, McGarry and O’Leary’s view, or a struggle for national freedom, the republican view, or

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Democratisation, nationalism and security in former Yugoslavia
Paul Latawski
and
Martin A. Smith

at peace-building in the former Yugoslavia 2 by focusing on the challenges to efforts to bring lasting stability posed by democratisation, ethnic nationalism and the promotion of security. NATO’s peace-building roles in Bosnia, Kosovo and Macedonia The deployment of the NATO IFOR to Bosnia in 1995 in the wake of the Dayton agreement and associated UNSC Resolutions marked the beginning of the Alliance

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Abstract only
Adrian Millar

Traditional approaches to conflict resolution Lederach Lederach is a leading proponent of transformation type conflict resolution who contends that conflict tends to occur where there are ethnic, regional and religious differences and arises over ‘long-standing animosities rooted in a perceived threat to identity and survival’ 1 and thus armed

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
The Other side
Author:

Conducting an analysis of some of the most candid interview materials ever gathered from former Irish Republican Army (IRA) members and loyalists in Northern Ireland, this book demonstrates through a psychoanalysis of slips of the tongue, jokes, rationalisations and contradictions that it is the unconscious dynamics of the conflict — that is, the pleasure to be found in suffering, failure, domination, submission and ignorance, and in rivalry over jouissance — that lead to the reproduction of polarisation between the Catholic and Protestant communities. As a result, it contends that traditional approaches to conflict resolution which overlook the unconscious are doomed and argues that a Lacanian psychoanalytic understanding of socio-ideological fantasy has great potential for informing the way we understand and study all inter-religious and ethnic conflicts and, as such, deserves to be further developed in conflict-management processes. Whether readers find themselves agreeing with the arguments in the book or not, they are sure to find it a change from both traditional approaches to conflict resolution and the existing mainly conservative analyses of the Northern Ireland conflict.