Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 70 items for :

  • "Ethnicity" x
  • Manchester Shakespeare x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Aesthetico-political misprision in Derricke’s A Discoverie of Woodkarne
Thomas Cartelli

rather than excremental in orientation – as, for example, Nerys Patterson does when she identifies them as braigetoir or braigetori and as Vincent Carey assumes in ‘Icons of Atrocity’ 2 – his exhaustive knowledge of the varied ensemble of presenters and entertainments on offer in early modern Irish banquet settings leads him to qualify the grosser form of negative ethnic stereotyping in which Derricke may be implicitly (or expressly) engaging. As Fletcher writes: The

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Hume, Bacon, Britain and Britishness
Christopher Ivic

themselves and their posterities’. 130 The reference points here are to the New English (‘English of birth’), the Old English (‘English of blood’), Ulster-based English and Scots (‘the new British colony’) and the Gaelic Irish (‘the old Irish natives’). This is a remarkable instance of an ethnic or racial classification of Ireland’s native and non-native inhabitants, for it is grounded in notions of blood and birthplace as well as a coming together of distinct national identities – English and Scottish, not Irish. ‘Ireland’, writes Linda Colley (although in reference to

in The subject of Britain, 1603–25
Violence, masculinity, and the colonial project in Derricke’s Image of Irelande
John Soderberg

imagine themselves as representatives of proper restraint and natural order, who conquer so that subject peoples can realize their productive potential. But, at some point, such abstract fantasies collide with messy realities that threaten to collapse artfully constructed ethnic dichotomies between colonizer and colonized. As Patricia Palmer has argued, ‘real violence bleeds into literary depictions of warfare and decapitation’ in Elizabethan literature concerning Ireland. 2 One particularly pressing contradiction

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Martial identities and the subject of conquest in Derricke’s Image of Irelande
Maryclaire Moroney

for centuries. 20 Furthermore, throughout the Elizabethan period, as Nicholas Canny notes, ‘significant numbers of men in the ranks refused the allegiances that were chosen for them by their betters’, which meant in practice that ‘English soldiers played a critical role in the war effort of the rebels, while every band in the government army contained Irish soldiers who sold their services to the highest bidder’. 21 The Crown’s forces, polyglot and multi-ethnic, featured recruits drawn largely from Wales and the West

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Abstract only
Accession, union, nationhood
Christopher Ivic

warn against a too-optimistic recovery of his and others’ seemingly progressive political ideas. Like many of his fellow Jacobeans, including Hume and Robert Pont, Bacon’s views on the native Irish (as well as non-Lowland Scots) are underpinned by deep ethnic and racial prejudices. The fourth chapter explores Shakespeare’s The Tragedie of Macbeth , which was composed and performed at the height of Anglo-Scottish union debate and just as the plethora of union tracts and treatises were circulating. Rather than simply reading ‘the Scottish play’ in relation to

in The subject of Britain, 1603–25
Transcultural encounters in early modern Italian theatre
Eric Nicholson

pejorative stereotyping of ethnicity or ‘national character’ – for various comical and/or serious effects. Applying insights from the comparative literary and cultural studies field of imagology, I emphasise the constructedness as well as persistence of such stereotypes, but also the counter-tendency of how real-life trends and circumstances could qualify or even undermine these same

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre
Abstract only
Josette Bushell-Mingo’s Cleopatra, Royal Exchange, Manchester, 2005; Tarell Alvin McCraney’s ‘radical edit’, Royal Shakespeare Company, The Public and GableStage, 2013
Carol Chillington Rutter

foregone conclusion; a suspenseful story playing out ‘now’ that holds in tension with it what we know retrospectively from history, that Rome won – and at what cost. Aiming, he said, to ‘do it with race and ethnicity’ (quoted in Hirschman 2014 ), to make visible the politically charged racial contours of Shakespeare's play, McCraney relocated Antony and Cleopatra to somewhere something like Shakespeare's imagined version of Plutarch's Egypt. He set it in Saint-Domingue, a French Caribbean colony as fabulously valuable to eighteenth

in Antony and Cleopatra
Abstract only
The Jacobean writing of Britain
Christopher Ivic

(descendants, Ayscu reminds his readers, of the Irish), into a shared and politically charged Anglo-Saxon ethnicity attests, as does the text’s many references to Scotland’s kings paying ‘homage’ to England’s. The final page’s reference to James being proclaimed ‘the onely lawfull, lineall, and rightfull King of England, France and Ireland ’ is an accurate reflection of the royal proclamation that announced Elizabeth’s successor, but James’s preferred title – King of ‘Great Britain’ – is conspicuous by its absence. 10 One might expect the majority of these works to be

in The subject of Britain, 1603–25
Abstract only
Thomas Herron
,
Denna J. Iammarino
, and
Maryclaire Moroney

Deuill’ O’More and where should his language and his loyalties lie? His father Ruarí held a native Irish O’More (Ó Mórdha) lordship and his stepmother, Margaret, was a Butler, granddaughter of the 8th Earl of Ormond and member of one of the most distinguished Anglo-Norman lineages in the country. 61 As a traitor, O’More’s corporeal division mirrors his mixed ethnic and political identities. Other critics, notably Willy Maley and Christopher Highley, bring our attention back from native Irish and English culture to the power

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Foreign Antony and Cleopatra in Britain and abroad
Carol Chillington Rutter

-negative’ Othello directed by Jude Kelly, a ‘race reversed’ production in which the Moor (Patrick Stewart) was the only white in the play. If the significance of black casting in Washington DC in 1988 was its insignificance, by 2014 in Ontario there was no ‘if’. As Liza Giffin, the SSF archivist, recalls, the ethnicity of Jamaican-born Yanna McIntosh and what it might ‘mean’ for Cleopatra wasn't ‘discussed at the time, and doesn't come up in director's/programme notes, publicity, news cuttings or anywhere’. 30

in Antony and Cleopatra