Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 222 items for :

  • "Everyday life" x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
ACT’s procedures of ‘pure creation’, 1993–96
Angela Harutyunyan

strategies attempts to situate them within those structural changes that took place in the aftermath of independence following the collapse of the USSR in 1991 and defined the trajectory for this decade. I investigate, describe and critically revisit those spaces and possibilities that emerge in the gaps between ‘pure creation’, a key concept developed by artist David Kareyan and made operational throughout the group’s existence, and the intensity of everyday life in Armenia in the mid-1990s. I argue that the concept of ‘pure creation’ emerges in the clash between

in The political aesthetics of the Armenian avant-garde
Kathryn Milligan

contrasting nature. Although working in the same period as Jack B. Yeats, Harry Kernoff’s artistic technique and choice of subject matter contrasts with his older peer, offering a different view of everyday life in Dublin and demonstrating the multiplicity of experience that characterises the modern city. Like Yeats, through his life Kernoff became a recognised figure in Dublin, conspicuous by his small stature and the large black fedora that he habitually wore. His travels around the city were made visibly evident through the drawings found among the artist’s papers, and

in Painting Dublin, 1886–1949
Tijana Vujošević

the Soviet statistician’s task as similar to that of an archaeologist or palaeontologist. The home is A home for a very industrious individual 69 therefore akin to an archaeological site. In “Everyday life and statistics” of 1923, the statistician explains his intentions. “They say that the great natural scientist Cuvier was able to paint the entire evolution of an animal on the basis of a single bone,” writes Strumilin. “Studies of primitive culture examine even meagre kitchen leftovers of the caveman and arrowheads […] of the Stone Age […] We would like to take

in Modernism and the making of the Soviet New Man
Tijana Vujošević

display, which shows the perfect temperature of the water. This photograph, taken in the Leningrad Trust for Public Baths and Laundries by an anonymous photographer, is a record of a beautiful and efficient enclosed environment, a perfectly functioning little world of pleasure and camaraderie. The picture is also a record of a design that, unlike many other things in Soviet everyday life, worked like magic. It comes from an era in which projects for bathhouses and spaces of hygiene, as well as the precision with which these environments were regulated, became a vehicle

in Modernism and the making of the Soviet New Man
Tijana Vujošević

“etheroneph” powered by “antimatter” and observes daily life on the Red Planet. He sees factories in which workers indulge in fulfilling labour and are free to change professions; fantastic glass-clad domestic architecture; progressive ways of childrearing; free love; and art museums transformed from sites for collection and accumulation into places for study. By experiencing everyday life in a Martian society, Leonid gets a picture of what his political struggle on Earth will bring about. In one scene in the novel, Leonid admires the beauty of vegetation on Mars, which is

in Modernism and the making of the Soviet New Man
Abstract only
Richard Kilborn

saga will bring (Junge, 2004: 259, 274, 308). Likewise with Seven Up, most observers are also agreed that much of the series’ enduring appeal lies in the way it succeeds in combining the attributes of a compelling social history and the more homespun qualities of a soap-like drama of everyday life. As Jonathan Freedland has written of 49 Up: [The film] is a full, revealing social history. And yet that is not the source of its power. That, and its intense poignancy, comes instead from the universal human story these lives tell. To see people ageing Concluding remarks

in Taking the long view
Abstract only
Activism and design in Italy
Author: Ilaria Vanni

Precarious objects is a book about activism and design. The context is the changes in work and employment from permanent to precarious arrangements in the twenty-first century in Italy. The book presents design interventions that address precarity as a defuturing force affecting political, social and material conditions. Precarious objects shows how design objects, called here ‘orientation devices’, recode political communication and reorient how things are imagined, produced and circulated. It also shows how design as a practice can reconfigure material conditions and prefigure ways to repair some of the effects of precarity on everyday life. Three microhistories illustrate activist repertoires that bring into play design, and design practices that are grounded in activism. While the vitality, experimental nature and traffic between theory and praxis of social movements in Italy have consistently attracted the interest of activists, students and researchers in diverse fields, there exists little in the area of design research. This is a study of design activism at the intersection of design theory and cultural research for researchers and students interested in design studies, cultural studies, social movements and Italian studies.

Abstract only
Antonio Turok’s photographs of the Zapatistas
Antigoni Memou

people to the centre of this collection, Turok breaks with a long tradition of visual marginalisation of these communities, which had been concomitant with their political repression. This chapter examines the way the book informs us about the everyday life of the ethnic communities in Mexico and, most importantly, considers the ways in which the book enhances our understanding of the Zapatista struggle. This chapter compares the photobook with stereotypical photographic representations of Mexican twentieth-century photography and seeks to evaluate the contribution of

in Photography and social movements
Antigoni Memou

predominance of masked citizens, the outstanding absence of armed Zapatistas, the plethora of open meetings and peaceful assemblies and the prominent role of women in the movement. A democratic image from the jungle The most predominant feature of the images available online is the omnipresence of masked Zapatistas. The indigenous people appear wearing masks in most photographs, in particular the posed ones (figure 16). Although the Zapatistas may not wear their balaclavas in their everyday life, they consider them necessary in the presence of the camera. A rare exception

in Photography and social movements
Abstract only
A problematic development
Fanny Lopez

the energy crisis increased the public administration’s lack of interest and the energy lobbies’ marginalization of disconnection advocates. As the causes of this problematic development were often associated with its image of “critical technology,” the relevance of this description would be discussed in view of its founding concepts: the self-guarantee of vital necessities and the reconstitution of an economy of everyday life. Overcoming negative symbolism Energy autonomy provided a glimpse of surprising spatial and social potential. Rather than a technical

in Dreams of disconnection