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Stephen Snelders

the modern asylum was portrayed as a key instrument of colonial rulers’ attempts to turn colonial subjects into modern citizens. In the last decade, this image changed again. Historians have developed more nuanced images, and thus they highlight asylums as complex microcosms where the sufferers had agency and everyday life was continuously renegotiated.2 This chapter explores these complex microcosms of the modern leprosy asylums in Suriname. In the decidedly unmodern Batavia asylum of the nineteenth century, Christian missionaries had already been involved in

in Leprosy and colonialism
Self-help books in the early decades of the twentieth century
Jill Kirby

that they are going insane. Do you? Well, that is your guarantee that you won't. No man went mad who thought he would.’ 59 Such symptoms were perhaps not so surprising in a period in which the challenges of everyday life were played out against a backdrop of apparent decline, crisis, pessimism and dismay, as Overy has argued. 60 During the 1920s unemployment remained at or above one million of the insured population and increased to three million after the Wall Street crash in 1929. In such circumstances, only the very rich were truly

in Feeling the strain
Italy and England compared
Sandra Cavallo and Tessa Storey

than on their printed counterparts.6 Moreover, they are examined for the information they provide about specific dietetic advice rather than for their distinctive characteristics as a genre.7 In what follows we would like to apply Pomata’s concept of epistemic genre and consider regimens as a discreet form of medical advice literature whose goal is the popularisation of expert recommendations about how to preserve health in everyday life through the correct management of one’s lifestyle and, more precisely, of the spheres of activity that medical theory defined as

in Conserving health in early modern culture
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Popularising psychoanalysis, 1945–68
Richard Bates

everyday parenting questions as opportunities to disseminate psychoanalytic ideas, by explaining concepts like ‘neurosis’, ‘complex’ and ‘castration’ in ordinary language and emphasising their relevance to everyday life. Thus in one text she defined a neurosis as ‘the fact of feeling impotent, of feeling completely stuck in an impossible situation’. 19 This definition left out some central elements of Freud’s concept, such as the conflict between different psychical entities, or the return of the repressed. Rather than broach

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
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Doltomania
Richard Bates

they constitute one of the most successful penetrations of psychoanalytic thinking into everyday life and institutions in France of all time, and indeed, arguably anywhere in the world. The concluding Afterword returns to the question of Dolto’s twenty-first-century reputation and of what France is to do with her legacy. Can the ongoing desire to celebrate the positive aspects of her interventions withstand an increased awareness – indeed, mockery – of the problematic and outdated aspects of her ideas? This book is

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
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Psychoanalysis in the public sphere, 1968–88
Richard Bates

that Dolto and her colleagues created after 1978. The proliferation of these centres across France is a particularly important example of Dolto’s success in disseminating psychoanalytic thinking into everyday life and institutions, representing perhaps the most extensive long-term project for taking psychoanalysis ‘beyond the couch’ anywhere in the world in recent decades. The MV project achieved an unusually extensive integration between psychoanalysis and state educational priorities. These ‘structures Dolto’, as

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
Dolto and the psychoanalytic approach to autism in France
Richard Bates

step of institutionalisation. Dolto had a track record of trying to keep similar children out of carceral institutions, and argued in 1985 that ‘society would benefit from a better integration of [autistic] children into everyday life’. 119 As her biographer Jean-François de Sauverzac argued, Dolto set herself ‘against a psychiatric vision which labels autistic people incurable’. 120 But parents of children like Dominique who consulted psychoanalysts also ran a risk that they would find themselves being

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
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Françoise breaks free?
Richard Bates

Margueritte’s La Garçonne (1922), a scandalous work owing to the sexual promiscuity and relative gender nonconformity of its lead character, though she ‘didn’t understand it at all’. 40 Henry’s library opened Dolto’s horizons to a wider world of knowledge, and indicated the direction of social, scientific and technological change. By 1924 it included books on and by Freud, probably translations of his 1909 Clark Lectures and The Psychopathology of Everyday Life , plus a 1924 explainer by Angelo Hesnard. 41 Françoise

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
Dolto, psychoanalysis and Catholicism from Occupation to Liberation
Richard Bates

advice to parents with a view to promoting moral and physical health in their children. In everyday life, many problems arise around children which demand practical solutions. How to react in such cases …? This is striking for its resemblance to the concept of Lorsque l’enfant paraît , the radio programme which made Dolto famous some thirty-five years later. The next edition of Vrai , dated 1 December, began to fulfil the promise, with a column by ‘M.’ (Dolto once more) entitled ‘Our

in Psychoanalysis and the family in twentieth-century France
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A cultural history of stress in twentieth-century Britain
Author: Jill Kirby

Drawing on a wealth of sources including self-help books, Mass Observation diaries and directives, oral history interviews, social science research and popular culture, Feeling the strain examines why stress became the ubiquitous explanation for a range of everyday ills by the end of the twentieth century in Britain. It explores the popular, vernacular discourse of nerves and stress to uncover how ordinary people understood, explained and coped with the pressures and strains of daily life and illuminates not only how stress was known, but the ways in which that knowledge was produced.

By focusing on contemporary popular understandings, it reveals continuity of ideas about work, mental health, status, gender and individual weakness, as well as the socio-economic contexts that enabled stress to become the accepted explanation for a wide range of daily experiences. It foregrounds continuities in managing stress and changes in ideas about causation, revealing a vocabulary of ‘nerves’ and ‘nervous disorders’ as precursors to stress but also illustrating the mutability of the stress concept and how its very imprecision gave it utility.

Feeling the strain provides first-hand accounts from sufferers, families and colleagues and offers insight into self-help literature, the meanings of work and changing dynamics of domestic life over the century, delivering a complementary perspective to medical histories of stress and making a significant contribution to histories of everyday life and emotion in Britain during the twentieth century.