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Teresa Phipps

these women may have been defining moments of their lives or points of crisis, but most of the cases and actions included here were more quotidian, representing the inordinate negotiations that made up everyday life and work. The negotiation of justice was therefore a normal part of urban life. Women and men living within England’s hundreds of medieval towns actively used their local courts to manage their interpersonal relationships, enforce business obligations and seek restitution for attacks that brought harm to their persons

in Medieval women and urban justice
Abstract only
Teresa Phipps

the nature of late medieval urban justice, the focus here is not on the institutions that delivered this justice but on the individuals (specifically the women) who engaged with and were subject to the mechanisms and customs of local justice in the course of their everyday lives. The urban records therefore serve to expand our view of women’s legal experiences to incorporate the many ways that they engaged with the law in everyday life. There is much to learn about the lives of ordinary women from the court rolls

in Medieval women and urban justice
Abstract only
Elisabeth Salter

Kelly (eds), Imagining the Books: Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe (Turnhout: Brepols, 2005), pp. 1–14, pp. 1–2. Salter, Popular reading in English.indd 233 21/05/2012 10:15:13 234 Popular reading in English c. 1400–1600 19 For a very useful discussion of the complex relationships between technology, invention, and changes in practice see F. Braudel, The Structure of Everyday Life: The Limits of the Possible, Civilization and Capitalism 15th–18th Century (London: Collins, 1981), pp. 334–5. Braudel explains that technological development is never

in Popular reading in English c. 1400–1600
Teresa Phipps

, they are significant for their broad jurisdiction and the fact that they may have offered the most frequent interaction with the law for many, if not a majority, of the residents of England’s towns. They dealt with disputes and issues that arose from everyday life and trade, rather than exceptional acts of crime or high-value financial disputes. It is this ‘ordinariness’ that makes these courts notable. Despite a wealth of records, urban court records remain relatively underused, and there is no existing overview of the

in Medieval women and urban justice
Hincmar, the polyptych of St-Rémi and the slaves of Courtisols
Josiane Barbier

, could distinguish the two conditions in everyday life. 53 There may have been another source of worry for Hincmar: it is not impossible that the ‘repressed’ mancipia had benefited from the tacit complicity of their neighbours. For, of the free co-tenants of the repressed mancipia named in the description of the estate, none witnessed or took part in either the judgment of May 847 or the repressio that followed, abstaining whether from ignorance, indifference, caution or sympathy. 54 This apparent village apathy was perhaps a form of

in Hincmar of Rheims
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Wayfinding in the Middle Ages
Ruth Evans

Kevin Lynch, I am not convinced from Lynch’s usage that he was the first to use it. Lynch defines wayfinding as ‘a consistent use and organization of definite sensory cues from the external environment’:  The Image of the City (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1960), p. 3.  4 The history of the medieval quotidian is relatively unmapped. But Antonia Gransden discusses ‘the trivialities of everyday life’ in her ‘Realistic observation in twelfth-century England’, Speculum, 47:1 (1972), 29–51 (30). See also D. Vance Smith, Arts of Possession: The Middle English Household

in Roadworks
Ideology and hagiographic narration
Eva von Contzen

may accompany the loss of estates and property. While the avoidance of the seven deadly sins is a topos, the fear of shame and debt are close to everyday life. What is more, they imply an interpersonal dimension less abstract than the damage inflicted on others by committing the sin of pride, avarice, or gluttony. And yet, aligning them with deadly sin underscores their detrimental impact. The final coda thus is more than a quaint individual stamp the poet puts on many of the legends: it subtly reminds the audience of communal values that should be kept and suggests

in The Scottish Legendary
Time, space, and the Scottishness of the Scottish Legendary
Eva von Contzen

or place of his or her life can be especially powerful when the location is close to the audience’s home and their everyday life. The South English Legendary, as already mentioned, takes advantage of this and establishes strong links between its English origin and the Englishness of many of its saints. The Scottish compilation, however, is different:  it refrains from the overt promotion of ‘Scottishness’ and a sense of national coherence. Rhiannon Purdie reminds us that Scottishness is more than Time, space and Scottishness 191 an individual author’s ‘quirks

in The Scottish Legendary
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Mending roads, being social
Valerie Allen

for discussion on the matter. 47 Fernand Braudel, Civilization and Capitalism 15th–18th Century, vol. 1: The Structures of Everyday Life: The Limits of the Possible, trans. Siân Reynolds (New York: Harper & Row, 1981), pp. 491–520 (p. 511). 48 Lorraine Attreed, ‘Urban identity in medieval English towns’, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 32:4 (2002), 571–92 (585–90). Sarah Rees Jones, ‘York’s civic administration, 1354–1464’, in Sarah Rees Jones (ed.), The Government of Medieval York: Essays in Commemoration of the 1396 Royal Charter, Borthwick Studies in

in Roadworks
Charles West

them. These tensions show that the history of the Carolingian parish cannot be confined to a point of origin of something pristine that would later be corrupted, or of something primitive that would be later perfected: it was a messy, and sometimes controversial, part of everyday life in northern Francia ‘already’ in the ninth century. More than that, though, what these tensions also reveal is the centrality of the parish to the Carolingian Church. For Hincmar, at least, the parish was not merely an aspect of his pastoral duties, it was a

in Hincmar of Rheims