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Tessa Whitehouse

and readers to position their faith within everyday life and extraordinary life-cycle events for purposes of prayer, comfort, and building community. Most, but not all, of the correspondents were Protestant Nonconformists. Where the friends were from different Protestant denominations, sharing life-cycle events was one way of reaffirming similarities and overcoming difference in doctrines or the institutions of religion. All of the friends take comfort in eschatological doctrines at moments of grief; consider

in Religion and life cycles in early modern England
Abstract only
Reading Elizabeth Smart
Heather Walton

to the end of her life. In adolescence she enjoyed the indulgence of a private space in which to express hopes, fears and yearnings. In her early twenties the journals became a site of more experimental writing; they contain reflections upon her reading and the minute details of her everyday life. Despite the scope they offered her to ‘try out’ different styles and voices she regards her journalling as second-order writing. The journals provided opportunity to practise writing in the same way as she routinely practised the piano. They did not fulfil her literary

in Literature, theology and feminism
Zoë Hudson

and spiritual lives. The three surviving volumes of Stonley’s personal diary record the everyday experiences of his family and household, including numerous references to births, deaths and marriages which took place within his extended social circle. What is particularly intriguing about Stonley’s diary entries is their combination of social, material and financial details, for both everyday life and unusual events. Through analysis of the life-cycle events recorded in the diaries, this

in Religion and life cycles in early modern England
medical pluralism and the search for hegemony
Enrique Perdiguero

do so it is necessary to move beyond the typical generalizations found in the history of medicine. Like the other contributors in this volume, this chapter aims to explore the presence of magical elements in everyday life during the modern period, and thereby broaden the usual location of magical practice in the medieval and early modern periods. 3 The chronological focus of the following discussion is defined by two major

in Witchcraft Continued
Michael Carter-Sinclair

in inexorable progress and rejected all other-worldly truths …. Universal care, which insured everyone against accident, sickness, [and] old age …. stands as a substitute for Godly providence.’ The bishops also believed that unfettered competition in business and in relations between nations meant that ‘survival of the fittest’ applied to everyday life. Wars were therefore inevitable in the modern world. 88 War, however, was not their only concern. If the Empire did collapse, and if the Emperor had to abdicate, a new state or states might emerge, and the bishops

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
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Michael Carter-Sinclair

economic and social progress. They moved among what was termed ‘good society.’ 3 They called for a prominent place in everyday life for what would normally be called bourgeois morality, even if their version was based on Christian values. Bourgeois agitators were joined by members of the lower clergy of the Catholic Church, who were prominent activists, even leaders, in the movement. But the Christian Socials had a dark side which set them firmly against liberal values of inclusivity, as they proudly expressed the core philosophy of their movement to be antisemitism

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Michael Carter-Sinclair

secular and spiritual which continued informally that evening at a dinner where most of the dignitaries would again be present. 56 These occasions are important indicators that blanket descriptions of the liberal state being complicit in the ostracising of priests, victimising them and stripping them of their dignity are wide of the mark. Some of the liberal press may have attacked, even mocked, the priests, but this was part of the rough and tumble of everyday life in the constitutional state. Moreover, the press that did attack the clergy, in the evidence

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Michael Carter-Sinclair

that have been encountered so far attended or participated at events and activities that were clearly antisemitic, but it should not be concluded that associations on the Catholic wing of society in Vienna were motivated solely by antisemitism, nor that they failed to have genuine and profound ties that bound them together. Yet alongside political and social opinions, alongside political activism, everyday life, with its celebrations and tragedies, should be recognised as a factor that bound people together. One such tragedy occurred on Sunday 25 August 1935, and

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Abstract only

), Everyday Life in the Middle Ages (Bologna: Liber, 1978), p. 108. 35 Barber, Bestiary , p. 96. 36 Bond, Misericords , p. 30. 37 Stephen Bull, The Civil Wars in Lancashire (Lancaster: Carnegie Publishing, 2009), p. 18. 38 Ibid. , p. 185. 39 Laird, English Misericords , p. 10. 40 H.S. Corran, The Isle of Man (David and

in Manchester Cathedral

Religion and life cycles in early modern England examines intersections between religion and all stages of the life course. It considers rites of passage that shaped an individual’s life, such as birth, death, marriage and childbirth. It investigates everyday lived experiences including attending school and church, going to work, praying, writing letters and singing hymns. It sets examples from different contexts alongside each other and traces how different religious confessions were impacted by the religious and political changes that occurred in the two centuries following the Reformation. These approaches demonstrate the existence of multiple and overlapping understandings of the life cycle in early modern England. The collection is structured around three phases: birth, childhood and youth; adulthood and everyday life; and the dying and the dead. Coexisting with the bodily life cycle were experiences which formed the social life cycle such as schooling, joining a profession, embarking on travel abroad, marriage, parenthood and widowhood. Woven through these occurrences, an individual’s religious life cycle can be seen: the occasions when they were welcomed into a particular faith; when they were tempted to convert; when they joined the ministry or a convent. Early modern individuals often reflected on times they personally acknowledged to have transformed their life or events which instigated their spiritual awakening. They did so creatively in diaries, letters, plays, portraits, diagrams, sermons, poetry and hymns. In this interdisciplinary collection, the complex meanings of life-cycle events for early modern people are shown to be shaped by religious belief and experience.