Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 75 items for :

  • "Everyday life" x
  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
The impact of devolution and cross-border cooperation

This book examines how the conflict affects people's daily behaviour in reinforcing sectarian or ghettoised notions and norms. It also examines whether and to what extent everyday life became normalised in the decade after the 1998 Good Friday Agreement (GFA). Cross-border commerce has been the stuff of everyday life ever since the partition of Ireland back in 1921. The book outlines how sectarianism and segregation are sustained and extended through the routine and mundane decisions that people make in their everyday lives. It explores the role of integrated education in breaking down residual sectarianism in Northern Ireland. The book examines the potential of the non-statutory Shared Education Programme (SEP) for fostering greater and more meaningful contact between pupils across the ethno-religious divide. It then focuses on women's involvement or women's marginalisation in society and politics. In considering women's political participation post-devolution, mention should be made of activities in the women's sector which created momentum for women's participation prior to the GFA. The book deals with the roles of those outside formal politics who engage in peace-making and everyday politics. It explores the fate of the Northern Irish Civic Forum and the role of section 75 of the 1998 Northern Ireland Act in creating more inclusive policy-making. Finally, the book explains how cross-border trade, shopping and economic development more generally, also employment and access to health services, affect how people navigate ethno-national differences; and how people cope with and seek to move beyond working-class isolation and social segregation.

The case of cross-border commerce
Eoin Magennis

Cross-border commerce has been the stuff of everyday life ever since the partition of Ireland back in 1921. Anecdotes about illegal commercial activity, or smuggling, have been common-place since that time, reflecting how the Irish border has been a negotiable barrier (Logue, 2000 ; Toibi’n, 1994 ). The everyday business of cross-border commerce – the connections

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
Abstract only
Madeleine Leonard

people in place, the physical landscape in which everyday life occurs is much more than a mere backdrop. The physicality of place is an important interpretive lens through which everyday life is accomplished. Landscapes themselves play a core role in constructing the fabric of social life. Place is the ‘cause’ as well as the ‘outcome’ of social action (Tickmayer, 2000 ). It is an agentic player in the construction

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Lee Jarvis
and
Michael Lister

investigate their negotiation and contestation within everyday life (also Lowndes and Thorp 2010 ). In other words, it is not sufficient – and perhaps not even possible – simply to ‘read off’ or assume a priori diminishments of citizenship through changes in legislative or policy frameworks. Instead, we must explore how citizens themselves interpret and respond to such changes

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Abstract only
The politics of everyday life
Cillian McGrattan
and
Elizabeth Meehan

programme, a new public culture, reform of the police and justice systems, decommissioning and demilitarisation changed the context of everyday life. Institutions to promote human rights, equality and political inclusion and to encourage North-South and East-West (Ireland-UK) cooperation – the Human Rights Commission and the Equality Commission as well as the North-South Ministerial Council

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

‘nests’ of Nazis, ferociously holding onto the port towns. Eighty per cent of all raids on France took place during 1944. Yet for some, bombing had been part of daily life since 1940. The study of everyday life in France during the Vichy years is a field still growing. For example, recent work by Shannon L.  Fogg, Nicole Dombrowski Risser and Julia S. Torrie is testament to a growing interest in the political dimensions of everyday life. Torrie’s work in particular shifts the discussion significantly towards civilian rather than daily life: it recognises that much of

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
Moving beyond segregated localities
Madeleine Leonard

’ as different to a perceived ‘them’. This necessitates rendering meaningful the perception that broad similarities exist between oneself and others that in turn differentiate one group from another. By locating these processes at the level of the everyday, this book has sought to illustrate how the accomplishment of everyday life is spatial, temporal and embodied. However

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Abstract only
Sandra Buchanan

overall formula. The learning that has taken place in Northern Ireland and the Border Counties over the period discussed here has been immense. However, like many conflicts, the lessons learned have not always been applied, with the situation in Iraq exemplifying this. Conflict transformation should not be viewed as something completely separate from everyday life, but nonetheless the funding

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Anti-terrorism powers and vernacular (in)securities
Lee Jarvis
and
Michael Lister

within anti-terrorism policy – or by decisions and discourses associated therewith – others announced themselves entirely unconcerned by recent initiatives in this area. This lack of concern was, for some, a product of the perceived distance between anti-terrorism measures and one’s own everyday life. Others, however, were more willing to countenance or even actively support quite considerable

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Abstract only
Lee Jarvis
and
Michael Lister

extent to which faith in citizenship and its protections underpins a sense of security from the force of (anti-)terrorism. To do this, the book concentrates on findings from a series of focus groups we conducted with different communities across the UK, identifying some of the ways in which anti-terrorism powers are understood and evaluated within ‘everydaylife. This, in turn

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security