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The Cavalier Parliament, the Great Ejection of 1662 and the first years of dissent
Elliot Vernon

agents as regular conventicles, as was the house of Frances, Countess of Exeter in Little Britain. 64 These conventicles appear to have largely hosted preaching and fasting, although there is some evidence that ejected ministers were also celebrating the sacraments with their lay followers. 65 It was reported that Bartholomew Beale, the auditor of the imprest of the Exchequer, had Arthur Jackson baptise one of his children, even though the child ‘was not weake’. Beale had earlier that year been informed on for paying for the

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
Elliot Vernon

lawyer and later Long Parliament MP. 14 Laud characterised the feoffees as ‘main instruments for the puritan faction’ and ‘dangerous to both Church and state’. 15 The feoffees’ operation did not survive the Laudian challenge in the court of Exchequer in 1633 and the operation was closed down with the forfeiture of the advowsons in the feoffees’ control. 16 A major aspect of the Laudian reforms was designed to bring about a stricter observance of the ‘new conformity’ required by the Laudian conceptualisation of

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
Elliot Vernon

, Paul’s Wharf, seeking to merge St Peter, Paul’s Wharf with their parish. The petition, supported by a recommendation from Calamy, Ashe, Jenkyn and Bartholomew Beale, the lay presbyterian auditor of the Exchequer, requested that John Jackson, the presbyterian minister of St Benet, be given the living to prevent the use of the Prayer Book by ‘disaffected persons’ at St Peter. This business appears to have failed only due to the death of Oliver Cromwell in September. 113 The political conflict between the Commonwealth

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
Living spirituality

Between 1598 and 1800, an estimated 3, 271 Catholic women left England to enter convents on the Continent. This study focuses more particularly upon those who became Benedictines in the seventeenth century, choosing exile in order to pursue their vocation for an enclosed life. Through the study of a wide variety of original manuscripts, including chronicles, death notices, clerical instructions, texts of spiritual guidance, but also the nuns’ own collections of notes, this book highlights the tensions between the contemplative ideal and the nuns’ personal experiences. Its first four chapters adopt a traditional historical approach to illustrate the tensions between theory and practice in the ideal of being dead to the world. They offer a prosopographical study of Benedictine convents in exile, and show how those houses were both cut-off and enclosed yet very much in touch with the religious and political developments at home. The next fur chapters propose a different point of entry into the history of nuns, with a study of emotions and the senses in the cloister, delving into the textual analysis of the nuns’ personal and communal documents to explore aspect of a lived spirituality, when the body, which so often hindered the spirit, at times enabled spiritual experience.

Zoë Hudson

in rural Warwickshire. 3 Living the first thirteen or fourteen years of his life as a Catholic under Henry VIII, he witnessed the Reformation, Counter-Reformation and the establishment of Elizabeth I’s Church of England. As a young man, Stonley worked for the Secretary of State, Sir William Petre, and in the 1550s he was appointed as one of four Tellers of the Exchequer at Westminster. Around this time Richard married Anne, a young widow with three sons. Richard and Anne went on to have three daughters

in Religion and life cycles in early modern England
Andrew Sneddon

Margaret’s parish in Carsington on 11 March 4 Keith Wrightson, English Society, 1580–1680 (6th edn, London, 2000), pp. 27– 33. Depositions: Nathaniel Boothouse vs Robert Hayward, 1696 (T.N.A., Records of Exchequer, E134/8WM3/EAST 11). 6 Derbyshire hearth tax assessments 1662–70, ed. David G. Edwards (Chesterfield, 1982), p. 195. 7 Roger Fieldhouse, ‘The hearth tax and other records’ in Alan Rogers (ed.), Group projects in local history (Kent, 1977), pp. 72–3, 80. 5 Childhood and early career 11 1656.8 Nonetheless, Francis Hutchinson and his brother Samuel were on

in Witchcraft and Whigs
Abstract only
Andrew Sneddon

, Thomas, who predeceased his father.20 17 See chapters 3 and 6. See chapters 6, 7 and 8. 19 Thomas Tarver and his wife Bridget vs. Richard Thelwall, 1710 (The National Archives, Kew [hereafter T.N.A.], Records of Exchequer, E134/9Anne/TRIN10); Nathaniel Salmon, The history of Hertfordshire, describing the county, and its antient monuments, particularly the Roman . . . (London, 1728), p. 261. 20 [Ulster Historical Foundation] Clergy of Down and Dromore (Belfast, 1996), part 2, p. 21; Sir Stephen Leslie (ed.), Dictionary of national biography [hereafter OldDNB] (63 vols

in Witchcraft and Whigs
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Jews in Britain – a historical overview
Geoffrey Alderman

themselves in England. These were indeed ‘the king’s Jews’. That is to say, as the only residents of Norman England legally entitled to lend money upon interest, they enjoyed the full protection of the Crown, to which they could appeal if a debtor defaulted on her or his loan repayment. Repayment of the debts owed to them was in fact guaranteed by the Crown, which levied a fee per loan. A special department of government – the Exchequer of the Jews – was established for this purpose. In practice, it acted as a Ministry of Jewish Affairs

in Leeds and its Jewish Community
Andrew Sneddon

, part 2, p. 22. 22 Francis Hutchinson to William Wake, June 1721 (C.C., Wake Letters, vol. 13, no. 251). 14 134 Ireland he died on 15 October 1720. Two weeks after Smythe’s death, William King wrote to the head of the Irish executive, the Lord Lieutenant, Charles Fitzroy, Duke of Grafton, to ask him to present the vacant bishopric to the Irish Dean of Clogher and chaplain to the House of Commons, William Gore. Gore was brother to the Chancellor of the Irish Exchequer, Ralph Gore, and both men were prominent members of the Irish interest.23 King was particularly

in Witchcraft and Whigs
An historical essay concerning witchcraft (1718)
Andrew Sneddon

last, 1612. Before Sir James Altham, and Sir Edward Bromley, Knights; barons of his Maiesties Court of Exchequer: and justices of assize, oyer and terminor, and generall gaole deliverie in the circuit of the north parts. Together with the arraignement and triall of Jennet Preston, at the assizes holden at the castle of Yorke, the seven and twentieth day of Julie last past, with her execution for the murther of Master Lister by witchcraft. Published and set forth by commandement of his Majesties justices of assize in the north parts (London, 1613). This trial has

in Witchcraft and Whigs