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The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs is an exciting, new open access journal hosted jointly by The Humanitarian Affairs Team at Save the Children UK, and Centre de Réflexion sur l’Action et les Savoirs Humanitaires MSF (Paris) and the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute at the University of Manchester. It will contribute to current thinking around humanitarian governance, policy and practice with academic rigour and political courage. The journal will challenge contributors and readers to think critically about humanitarian issues that are often approached from reductionist assumptions about what experience and evidence mean. It will cover contemporary, historical, methodological and applied subject matters and will bring together studies, debates and literature reviews. The journal will engage with these through diverse online content, including peer reviewed articles, expert interviews, policy analyses, literature reviews and ‘spotlight’ features.

Our rationale can be summed up as follows: the sector is growing and is facing severe ethical and practical challenges. The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs will provide a space for serious and inter-disciplinary academic and practitioner exchanges on pressing issues of international interest.

The journal aims to be a home and platform for leading thinkers on humanitarian affairs, a place where ideas are floated, controversies are aired and new research is published and scrutinised. Areas in which submissions will be considered include humanitarian financing, migrations and responses, the history of humanitarian aid, failed humanitarian interventions, media representations of humanitarianism, the changing landscape of humanitarianism, the response of states to foreign interventions and critical debates on concepts such as resilience or security.

Fabrice Weissman

security forces turned security advisors spend countless hours training aid workers on ‘how to manage kidnapping crises’. The policy advocated almost routinely by these experts can be summed up as ‘Pay, don’t say’. In the eyes of private security firms, ‘kidnapping can be reduced to a simple business negotiation’ 2 that requires the strictest confidentiality. According to Alain Juillet, former intelligence director at the DGSE (the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Arjun Claire

been conceived as a triumph of reason and rationality over emotions. To the extent it relies on emotions, it carefully directs them through curated narratives deployed in the realisation of predetermined advocacy objectives ( Fernandes, 2017 : 2). With humanitarian actors increasingly engaging in specific thematic issues and policy changes, they have privileged authoritative facts that positions them as experts, enhancing their legitimacy in the eyes of decision

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

, Russians and Iranians, and between rebel and regime groups. All are extremely active online. Pro-regime Russian content producers have created websites and attacked groups like the White Helmets, calling them ‘terrorists’ and dismissing stories about children killed by chemical attacks as fake news featuring ‘actors’ ( Solon, 2017 ). In articles from all sides of the campaign, there are links to official-looking reports and the biographies of experts that seem trustworthy. It can be very difficult to discern the provenance of information or

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

order the series’. Rockbrune accumulated an extensive knowledge of their work and activities. The attention of this shipping expert to the structure of the program, and his commitment to its goals, speak volumes about the ambitions and the meaning of the school development education during this period, and about the resources CIDA invested in its quality and sustainability. Still clear in Rockbrune’s memory were the routes of materials, the nature of the products on offer for each age group, the timing of publications’ updates and shipments, and the titles of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Rainer Schlösser, Spokesperson of the Association of the Red Cross Museums in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der deutschen Rotkreuz-Museen)
Sönke Kunkel

it costs money and you have to find qualified staff to do that. SK: Speaking of staff and personnel, one thing I was wondering about is whether you work with professionals – museologists, trained museum staff, museum educators, and so on? RS: This differs across German Red Cross museums. In our own case, here in Luckenwalde, we worked together with an expert from the regional museum association when we set up the museum. So we got a good deal of advice on how to organize exhibit spaces and so on. The director of the association is now also a member of our

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Brendan T. Lawson

counting practices form an increasingly larger part of everyone’s workload, it also privileges certain types of expertise over others. Since the 1990s, there has been a shift from experience-based opinion within the humanitarian sector towards quantitative experts who practice auditing, deploy accountancy and conduct numerical-based research ( Barnett, 2013 ; Beerli and Weissman, 2016 ). The dominance of these quantitative experts has been demonstrated in the work that

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles
Rony Brauman

important issue for contemporary humanitarian action. This article is thus an historically informed contemplation on the political function of IHL and what we can expect from it. The Soldier, the Legal Expert and the Rescuer Let us begin with the first Geneva Convention, the starting point of contemporary IHL; it was signed on 22 August 1864 1 and did not even mention the word ‘humanitarian’. In ten articles occupying two pages, its subject (as

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Nazanin Zadeh-Cummings and Lauren Harris

agriculture are subject to long waiting times, reducing humanitarian ability to respond to need in a timely fashion. The UN Country team reported 22 examples of delays to the UN Panel of Experts (PoE) in January 2019, with some activities being delayed by over nine months ( UN PoE, 2019 : 364–69). One interviewee explained that long processing times leave their organisation unable to be flexible and challenges their ability to serve the North Korean people because they need to plan about two and a half years in advance. OFAC licenses can take over a year, according to one

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Róisín Read

, A. ( 2019 ), ‘ Gender Experts and Critical Friends: Research in Relations of Proximity ’, European Journal of Politics and Gender , 2 : 1 , 131 – 47 , doi: 10.1332/251510819X15471289106068 . Houldey , G. ( 2019 ), ‘ Humanitarian Response and Stress in Kenya: Gendered Problems and Their Implications

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs