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Ralph Knevet's Supplement of the Faery Queene (1635) is a narrative and allegorical work, which weaves together a complex collection of tales and episodes, featuring knights, ladies, sorcerers, monsters, vertiginous fortresses and deadly battles – a chivalric romp in Spenser's cod medieval style. The poem shadows recent English history, and the major military and political events of the Thirty Years War. But the Supplement is also an ambitiously intertextual poem, weaving together materials from mythic, literary, historical, scientific, theological, and many other kinds of written sources. Its encyclopaedic ambitions combine with Knevet's historical focus to produce an allegorical epic poem of considerable interest and power.

This new edition of Knevet's Supplement, the first scholarly text of the poem ever published, situates it in its literary, historical, biographical, and intellectual contexts. An extensive introduction and copious critical commentary, positioned at the back of the book, will enable students and scholars alike to access Knevet's complicated and enigmatic meanings, structures, and allusions.

This book is the first ever concordance to the rhymes of Spenser’s epic. It gives the reader unparalleled access to the formal nuts and bolts of this massive poem: the rhymes which he used to structure its intricate stanzas.

As well as the main concordance to the rhymes, the volume features a wealth of ancillary materials, which will be of value to both professional Spenserians and students, including distribution lists and an alphabetical listing of all the words in The Faerie Queene. The volume breaks new ground by including two studies by Richard Danson Brown and J. B. Lethbridge, so that the reader is given provocative analyses alongside the raw data about Spenser as a rhymer. Brown considers the reception of rhyme, theoretical models and how Spenser’s rhymes may be reading for meaning. Lethbridge in contrast discusses the formulaic and rhetorical character of the rhymes.

Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

objects, and from the knowledge and expertise of cultural intermediaries that had traditionally ascribed such value to them, to the public’s sense of what culture ‘does’ for them. Some criticised Jowell and the ‘public value’-oriented approaches to culture that followed hers for undermining expert cultural knowledge and putting too much judgement in the hands of the people. Such

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Abstract only
Stephen Orgel

works themselves, would certainly have been Inigo Jones, at least as long as they remained on friendly terms. Jones was by 1615 a genuine expert. Even before the Italian trip with the Arundels he was advising the Prince of Wales and the Earl of Rutland on artistic matters, and after his return his major clients, in addition to the Arundels, were Prince Charles and the Duke of

in Spectacular Performances
Glen Byam Shaw, Shakespeare Memorial Theatre, 1953
Carol Chillington Rutter

of slaves waving wands wo’nt [ sic ] do it’ (NB 1943). Then he reminds himself of the limits of imaginative projection: ‘as I said before, this cannot really be done on paper, as it were, without expert advice’ (NB 1943). In 1953 that ‘expert advice’ came from Motley. For twenty years, constantly updating their work, the Motley collective had been practitioners of the ‘new stagecraft’ influenced by what they'd seen of the ‘unified concept’ design of Diaghilev's Ballets Russes and Theodore Komisarjevsky's productions of Chekhov in the 1930s

in Antony and Cleopatra
Stephen Orgel

is, in fact, not by Dürer, but by an expert copyist working in the latter half of the sixteenth century named Jan Wierix. With a magnifying glass and the original print, it is possible to see slight differences – in hatching and such – and there is one real giveaway, though it’s difficult to spot unless you know what to look for; but the copy is a very expert one. My second

in Spectacular Performances
Abstract only
Stephen Orgel

Mizaldus’s practical expertise that is critical here, but his own reliance on prior authority – Lupton’s account concludes, “Which he had out of a very old book of the seven herbs of the planets, written to Hermes.” What is expert about Mizaldus’s testimony to the remedy’s effectiveness, “oftentimes proved,” is the antiquity of his reference book, and its association with the

in Spectacular Performances
Abstract only
The continuity of cultural value
Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

Reductions in state funding had accelerated the impetus towards the changes that Anderson described. They had been accompanied by a wider distrust of expert authority or any claim to value that did not acknowledge the importance of individual choice. By separating the economic conditions of production from the value of the customer experience, practitioners and managers could sustain the connection between

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

the BSA meeting described in Chapter 1 , expert accounts of Shakespeare and social analysis of his theatrical reproduction, however intellectually authoritative, no longer have a direct impact on the advocacy of value. Rather, it is the form of the knowledge applied that allows it to connect with and reinforce the value of the elusive essential Shakespeare. Narratives of conversion seem to have a

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

enthusiasts who attended the meeting had already identified themselves as advocates for Shakespeare’s cultural value, and the discussion focused on reiterating and refining that advocacy through a dialogue with experts and with one another. The discussion on that occasion took the form of a response to a panel of three speakers who – in response to the question, ‘is Shakespeare good for you?’ – had offered

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England