Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 51 items for :

  • Manchester Digital Textbooks x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Peter Barry

openly faced, rather than remaining ‘buried’ in the unconscious. This practice is based upon specific theories of how the mind, the instincts, and sexuality work. These theories were developed by the Austrian Sigmund Freud (1856–1939). There is a growing consensus today that the therapeutic value of the method is limited, and that Freud's life-work is seriously flawed by methodological irregularities. All the same, Freud remains a major cultural force, and his impact on how we think about ourselves has been incalculable. Freud's major ideas include those italicised

in Beginning theory (fourth edition)
Anna Green and Kathleen Troup

historians, psychoanalysts, and ‘psychohistorians’ to date, however, suggests that no such simple solution exists, and of course, as we see below, such a solution has been critiqued as ‘ahistorical’. This chapter focuses on the use of psychoanalysis (a subset of psychology) in history: uses of other forms of psychology are discussed in later chapters, in particular in chapter 15 on the emotions. 4 Psychoanalytic theory was developed by Sigmund Freud in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but was little employed by historians in the first half of the

in The houses of history
Abstract only
Peter Barry

fatally hands over the world of the rational to men and reserves for women a traditionally emotive, intuitive, trans-rational, and ‘privatised’ arena. Not surprisingly, therefore, the language question is one of the most contentious areas of feminist criticism. Feminist criticism and psychoanalysis The story so far of feminism's relationship with psychoanalysis is simple in outline but complex in nuance. The story can be said to begin, like so much else, with Kate Millett's Sexual Politics in 1969 which condemns Freud as a prime source of the patriarchal attitudes

in Beginning theory (fourth edition)
Abstract only
Dana Arnold

described almost simultaneously. However, in the pre-Freudian world of the long eighteenth century this form of writing opened the door to what was to become known as the human subconscious. And it is helpful to use Freud anachronistically to understand the role of memory in the subjective experience of Rome. Importantly, too, Freud gives us some insight into the part prints played in the memorialisation of cities. There is no doubt of the importance of the city – not least Rome – as a means of describing the workings of the mind. For instance in Freud’s Civilization

in Architecture and ekphrasis
Ben Cohen and Eve Garrard

speaks, for instance, of ‘the sort of pain which the torturer hopes to create in his victim by depriving him of language and thereby of a connection with human institutions’. He writes with regard to Freud: ‘By seeing every human being as consciously or unconsciously acting out an idiosyncratic fantasy, we can see the distinctively human, as opposed to animal, portion of each human life as the use for symbolic purposes of every particular person, object, situation, event, and word encountered in later life.’ He quotes with approval Lionel Trilling’s view of Freud – who

in The Norman Geras Reader
Abstract only
Anna Green and Kathleen Troup

entirely compatible with the explanatory structuralist analyses of social scientists, such as the theories of Freud, Marx, or Saussure. As Sewell noted, when historians ‘borrow social-theoretical concepts we often find that the concepts don’t quite fit’: as you read the chapters, think about how historians adapt, revise or combine different theories or concepts in their analyses of continuity and change in the past. 30 One of the major ways in which historians conventionally divide time is by periodization, homogeneous conceptualising categories such as Medieval, Early

in The houses of history
Kathryn Reeves

. 2 Mitchell, S. A. and Black, M. J. Freud and Beyond: A History of Modern Psychoanalytic Thought (New York, 1995), p. 226. 3 Kramer, K. guest editor The Journal of the Mid America Print Council , Vol. 5, Issue 2, 2

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Abstract only
John McLeod

Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan. In his Introduction, Bhabha turns to Freud’s writings on the unheimlich , often translated as the ‘unhomely’ or ‘uncanny’. As Freud uses the term, an uncanny experience can be prompted when something that we have hitherto regarded as imaginary appears before us in reality, or when something that has been previously concealed or forgotten disturbingly returns. In Bhabha’s thinking, the disruption of received totalising narratives of individual and group identity made possible at the ‘border’ can be described as an ‘uncanny’ moment, where

in Beginning postcolonialism (second edition)
Abstract only
Peter Barry

, especially those concerning the need for close verbal analysis of literary texts and the special recognition of literary language as a medium with its own characteristics that set it aside from day-to-day language. The suppressed Russian Formalists also had an influence in Germany, on the Frankfurt School of Marxist aesthetics. The school was founded in 1923, as a political research institute attached to the University of Frankfurt. They practised a form of criticism which tried to combine Freud and Marx, as well as aspects of Formalism. The best-known figures here are

in Beginning theory (fourth edition)
Mark Jordan

simulacra of our modernity cluster in two privileged scenes, psychoanalysis and theatre. (The intertwining of these two is a topic in Klossowski’s first novella, La vocation suspendue , as well as in Foucault’s Histoire de la folie .) Psychoanalysis and theatre are assigned, respectively, to Freud and Artaud. Indeed, Foucault describes theatre in terms that recall Artaud

in Foucault’s theatres