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The abjection of the Middle Ages
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

even as that past is used to abject the very efficacy of the truth-discerning technology. No less a figure than Sigmund Freud, in fact, suggested that those who theorised about, and used, torture in order to elicit confessions of demonic possession in the Middle Ages had real insight, even if their terminology was somewhat faulty: ‘by pronouncing possession by a demon to be the cause of hysterical

in Affective medievalism
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Medieval and medievalist practice
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

-century torture. 39 She gives expression to one of the central tenets of what Sigmund Freud describes as ‘das Unheimlich’ or the uncanny. Freud characterises the uncanny as ‘nothing new or strange, but something that was long familiar to the psyche and was estranged from it only through being repressed’. 40 The experience of the uncanny hinges on a kind of intellectual hesitation ( Unsicherheit ) when the

in Affective medievalism
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Roads and writing
Valerie Allen and Ruth Evans

1 Introduction: roads and writing Valerie Allen and Ruth Evans It was the road, wet, rough, and uncertain as it sometimes was, that made the land a kingdom.1 Roads and writing In his 1966 discussion of Sigmund Freud’s metaphorical model of the structure of the psychical apparatus as a writing machine (the so-called ‘Mystic Writing-Pad’, a wax pad covered with cellophane, on which a child first writes and then lifts the cellophane to erase the words, only for the words to remain imprinted on the wax below), the philosopher Jacques Derrida yokes together two

in Roadworks
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

At the end of Civilization and Its Discontents , Freud famously recapitulates the thesis of his book by suggesting that something has altered the eternal struggle between Eros and Thanatos. Human aggression now has the capability to extinguish not just some lives, but all humankind and this, he claims, has led to ‘their current unrest, their unhappiness and their mood

in Affective medievalism
Shayne Aaron Legassie

Eglamour of Artois, Sir Tryamour, 2nd edn (Kalamazoo:  Medieval Institute Publications, 2006), p. 124. 40 The Knightly Tale of Gologras and Gawain, in Thomas Hahn (ed.), Sir Gawain: Eleven Romances and Tales (Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 1995), p. 58. 41 Terrence Cave, Recognitions: A Study in Poetics (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1988), demonstrates the almost infinite ways in which recognition scenes produce meaning in literary texts. 42 Lacan, departing from Freud, argued that hysteria was not exclusively pathological, but rather also constituted one of

in Roadworks
Mind, soul and intellectual disability
Irina Metzler

reason and two irrational forces had even influenced Sigmund Freud, ‘The Ego and the Id’, Standard Edition, vol. 19, 25. 108 Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind , 125. 109 Posidonius, On Emotions , in Galen, De placitis Hippocratis et Platonis , 5.5.4–5, ed. de Lacy, 316, 318, cited in Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind , 129. 110 Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind , 125; see Posidonius, On Emotions , in Galen, De placitis Hippocratis et Platonis , 5.6.38, 5.5.34, ed. de Lacy, 334, 324

in Fools and idiots?
Paul Strohm

author-outside-thetext and what might be called the ‘biographical encounter’. The author-in-the-text Freud imagines two levels of identification, which might for convenience be called ‘primary’ and ‘secondary’.7 Primary identification occurs in infancy, and involves the abandonment of an object-identification and the ‘taking up’ of the identification into Introduction Identifying, and identifying with, Chaucer 17 the child’s ego. This process involves a form of participation that amounts to a convergence of self and other, and the elimination of the subject

in Contemporary Chaucer across the centuries
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Chaucer: validity in interpretation
S. H. Rigby

also as a thinker who managed to anticipate the social theory of Marx, the psychology of Freud and Lacan, and the linguistics of Derrida. Here, by contrast, I have emphasised the alterity of medieval texts and of the presuppositions underlying Chaucer’s world-view. In an age which demands ‘relevance’, an historical perspective suggests to us that the literature of the past

in Chaucer in context
Incongruity in Feþegeorn (R.31)
Jonathan Wilcox

about the processes occurring during the resolution of incongruity. 6 They suggest that the audience lives in a constant state of constraint from which humour allows a temporary reprieve. Freud is the most famous exponent of this theory, suggesting that jokes (which for him are a limited subset of tendentious humour and are always about sex and violence) provide a momentary freeing from the repression of sexual and violent urges. Such release highlights why the breaking of taboos can be such a fruitful arena for humour. A different version of release theory suggests

in Riddles at work in the early medieval tradition
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William Morris’s News from Nowhere and Chaucer’s dream visions
John M. Ganim

what he takes to be classical Greece’s frankness or medieval France’s therapeutic ideals of urbanism. Of medieval Paris, although it was packed with strangers and ‘its streets were rampant with gratuitous violence, its economy shuffled human beings from town to town as well as goods, the city could nonetheless be shaped into a moral geography’.4 Its gardens were planned as places of respite and privacy for those that had neither. In the end, Sennett allows that a perfect city is not possible because of our own divided and conflicted desires, between what Freud called

in Contemporary Chaucer across the centuries