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Lindsey Dodd

latter among eleven- to fourteen-year-olds. He concluded that ‘the youngest age group is most vulnerable’, while older children often saw raids ‘as an adventure’.32 Edward Glover suggested that children over two years could understand the components of bombing, writing that while children were afraid, ‘their fear is neither as universal nor as overwhelming v 10 v Introduction as has been expected’.33 In their nurseries research, Dorothy Burlingham and Anna Freud discovered that during traumatic experiences, the presence of a parent (or trusted carer) reduced

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
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Pathologising security through Lacanian desire
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

question. Is this performance pleasurable? To understand this question, we must familiarise ourselves with psychoanalytic theory and its reading of pleasure. Such theory is dedicated to exploring the drives that stimulate action and mental activity. Building upon Freud’s discussions of the pleasure principle and the death-drive, repetitive compulsion is linked to pre

in Death and security
Adrian Millar

psychoanalysis but it always appears as a defence. 29 It is best understood for the purposes of the present study as the unconscious process whereby the individual attributes to another wishes, qualities or feelings ‘that the subject repudiates or refuses to recognise in himself’. 30 As pointed out by Freud, the ego projects what it finds too unpleasurable because of its intensity

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
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Adrian Millar

operate in conflict situations unless there is more fundamental change on the level of rationalisations that operate in the constitution of political identity and out of which structures develop. Below I consider change in Lacanian psychoanalysis. Lacanian change Psychoanalysis is concerned with social change. Freud saw the goal of psychoanalysis – the talking

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
From the ‘scramble for Africa’ to the Great War
Rebecca Gill

. The expectation, as Sigmund Freud reflected in 1915, had been that war would be a ‘chivalrous passage of arms’ in which ‘all the international undertakings and institutions in which the common civilization of peace-time had been embodied would be maintained’. 98 For Freud, of course, war-time transgression was unsurprising, given civilised man’s underlying barbarism

in Calculating compassion
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Moving beyond segregated localities
Madeleine Leonard

their own in which to assert themselves, and are also grounded in (if not tied to) the specificities of particular locations’. Chapters 4 and 5 outlined a range of ways in which young people from interface areas draw on the ‘narcissism of minor differences’, and, as Freud ( 1930 : 199) makes clear, ‘it is precisely the minor differences in people who are otherwise alike that form the basis of

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
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Adrian Millar

confined myself to a detailed analysis of seventeen of these and drew on the other interviews for background materials and particular examples. However small the numbers, one has only to look at Freud to understand that insight can be gathered from a few subjects. 16 The interviews with republicans were recorded in Belfast in the summer of 1995, during the first IRA ceasefire that collapsed in February 1996. On average, interviews

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Hallucinating conflict in the political and personal frontiers of Ulster during the IRA border campaign of 1920–22
Fiachra Byrne

, femininity’, in J. Mills (ed.), Rereading Freud: Psychoanalysis through Philosophy (New York: SUNY Press, 2012), p. 91. 101 Nolan, ‘Commentary’, 954. 102 Ibid ., 958

in Medicine, health and Irish experiences of conflict 1914–45
Tim Aistrope

clinical definition of paranoia as a starting point, which they then attempts to use as an analogy for their analysis of political culture. This inevitably leads to heavy connotations of psychological abnormality. 121 Freud’s infantile fantasy stages underwrite the analysis – young boys, raised in a ‘women’s world’, are ripped away from this safe space into a tightly demarcated

in Conspiracy theory and American foreign policy
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Death and security – the only two certainties
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

mortality and yet we are still compelled to act and live. Security is the response that reaffirms the symbolic order of sovereign and subject . Zygmunt Bauman, in particular, explores wide-ranging philosophical literature on the function of rational, cultural and linguistic systems as effacing death. Drawing from Schopenhauer, Becker and Freud he argues that a multidirectional relationship of

in Death and security