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Hysteria, paranoia, psychosis
Jeremy Tambling

Dora This chapter begins with three of Freud’s ‘case-histories’: Dora, diagnosed as hysterical; Schreber, a paranoid schizophrenic, and the Wolf Man (a case of infantile neurosis), in order to approach Lacan on paranoia and psychosis. The ‘Dora’ case turned out negatively. For the other two, Lacan has been one of the most significant commentators

in Literature and psychoanalysis
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Jeremy Tambling

This chapter strikes out on a pathway of charting how Freud considered memory, as one of the processes working through the subject, and I will do so through a specific ‘case-history’. Although Freud thought psychoanalysis was in the pursuit of truth, the speculative nature of his writing, and the different, irreconcilable models of thought, set side by side alongside each

in Literature and psychoanalysis
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Jeremy Tambling

’Criminals from a sense of guilt’ Macbeth Is guilt – like the ‘Rat Man’s’ – the primary theme of literature? In ‘Some Characters Met With in Psychoanalytic Work’ (1916), Freud discusses some ‘surprising traits of character’ ( SE 14.311) which he has detected in his patients: forms of resistance to treatment, ways in

in Literature and psychoanalysis
Jeremy Tambling

Not only did Freud know literature intimately, and quote liberally from literatures of several languages, he has also inspired twentieth-century writers, as well as artists and philosophers, and created several schools of criticism, in literary and cultural studies. This chapter contains examples of attempts at criticism inspired by Freud. The first uses Freud to consider a poem by

in Literature and psychoanalysis
Author: Jeremy Tambling

Not only did Sigmund Freud know literature intimately, and quote liberally from literatures of several languages, he has also inspired twentieth-century writers and philosophers, and created several schools of criticism, in literary and cultural studies. Freud was not just practising psychotherapy on his patients, helping them in difficult situations, but helping them by studying the unconscious as the basis of their problems. This book deals with Freud and psychoanalysis, and begins by analysing the 'Copernican revolution' which meant that psychoanalysis decentres the conscious mind, the ego. It shows how Freud illuminates literature, as Freud needs attention for what he says about literature. The book presents one of Freud's 'case-histories', where he discussed particular examples of analysis by examining obsessional neurosis, as distinct from hysteria. It analyses Freud on memory, in relation to consciousness, repression and the unconscious. Guilt was one of his central topics of his work, and the book explores it through several critical texts, 'Criminals from a Sense of Guilt', and 'The Ego and the Id'. The book discusses Melanie Klein, a follower of Freud, and object-relations theory, while also making a reference to Julia Kristeva. One of the main strands of thought of Jacques Lacan was the categories of the Imaginary, the Symbolic, and the Real, as well as paranoia and madness, which are linked to literature here. The book finally returns to Freud on hysteria, and examines him on paranoia in Daniel Paul Schreber, and the psychosis of the 'Wolf Man'.

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Author: Nicholas Royle

This book provides a lucid, wide-ranging and up-to-date critical introduction to the writings of Hélène Cixous (1937–). Cixous is often considered ‘difficult’. Moreover she is extraordinarily prolific, having published dozens of books, essays, plays and other texts. Royle avoids any pretence of a comprehensive survey, instead offering a rich and diverse sampling. At once expository and playful, original and funny, this micrological approach enables a new critical understanding and appreciation of Cixous’s writing. If there is complexity in her work, Royle suggests, there is also uncanny simplicity and great pleasure. The book focuses on key motifs such as dreams, the supernatural, literature, psychoanalysis, creative writing, realism, sexual differences, laughter, secrets, the ‘Mother unconscious’, drawing, painting, autobiography as ‘double life writing’, unidentifiable literary objects (ULOs), telephones, non-human animals, telepathy and the ‘art of cutting’. Particular stress is given to Cixous’s work in relation to Sigmund Freud and Jacques Derrida, as well as to her importance in the context of ‘English literature’. There are close readings of Shakespeare, Emily Brontë, P. B. Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Lewis Carroll, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce and Samuel Beckett, for example, alongside in-depth explorations of her own writings, from Inside (1969) and ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’ (1975) up to the present. Royle’s book will be of particular interest to students and academics coming to Cixous’s work for the first time, but it will also appeal to readers interested in contemporary literature, creative writing, life writing, narrative theory, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory, ecology, drawing and painting.

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Freud’s Copernican revolution
Jeremy Tambling

Freud’s biography Before discussing psychoanalysis and literature, we must ask the question: who was Freud, creator of psychoanalysis, whose name, as an adjective – ‘Freudian’ – invokes unconscious thought and motivations, and sexuality? He was born on 6 May 1856, in Pribor, then called Freiberg, in Moravia, in the now Czech Republic, then part of

in Literature and psychoanalysis
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On sitting down to read a letter from Freud
Nicholas Royle

I wake up awash in the cries of herring gulls, not yet light, and am thinking what an extraordinary thing, in 2017, to have received a letter from Freud, fresh this morning, written in English. It’s the ever-odd of the hypnopompic, how much can be held, recalled, cradled before the great tsunami of oblivion called ‘everyday life’. I know that there were several sentences, already receding in a great silent sucking motion, passed all tensions, all tense past, but the only words that survive the experience of being hauled up out of the quicksands of sleep

in Hélène Cixous
Nicholas Royle

enchantment and enchancement, fate and (in Freud’s phrase) ‘a kind of magic’, perhaps, and above all the fairy or demon of literary fiction . 1 As Derrida comments, with respect to the fort-da movement of Beyond the Pleasure Principle : ‘ “literary fiction” … already watches over, like a fairy or demon [ comme une fée ou un demon ], the structure of the fort:da , its scene of writing or of inheritance in dissemination’. 2 It watches over everything, it watches, it wakes, to awake: fairyground analysis. They’re not interested in resting inter or transitioning, in

in Hélène Cixous
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Jeremy Tambling

This chapter engages with Jacques Lacan’s influential ‘return to Freud’, and that requires engaging with some Freud texts examined only partially so far: The Interpretation of Dreams, Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious, ‘Instincts and Their Vicissitudes’ and Beyond the Pleasure Principle. I discuss four of Lacan’s essays in the Écrits, and

in Literature and psychoanalysis