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Raleigh’s ‘Ocean to Scinthia’, Spenser’s ‘Colin Clouts Come Home Againe’ and The Faerie Queene IV.vii in colonial context
Thomas Herron

–4. 102 Quinn, Raleigh, 155; on Raleigh’s Irish smelting industry, see Canny, ‘Raleigh’s’, 95. 103 Kenneth Nicholls, ‘Woodland Cover in Pre-Modern Ireland’, in Gaelic Ireland: Land, Lordship and Settlement c.1250–c.1650, ed. Patrick J. Duffy, David Edwards, and Elizabeth Fitzpatrick (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001), 181–206: 199. MUP_Armitage_Ralegh.indd 136 07/10/2013 14:09 Love’s ‘emperye’ 137 speaker. Summer otium turns forest of Error redolent of his colonial situation in Spenser’s poetry.104 A second material fixation of the poem is terrestrial and mineral

in Literary and visual Ralegh
Abstract only
Gaelic poetry and English books
Mícheál MacCraith

8 Omnia vincit amor: Gaelic poetry and English books Mícheál Mac Craith Gaelic Ireland is somewhat under-represented in studies of the Renaissance. While two recent volumes of essays, edited by Thomas Herron and Michael Potterton in 2007 and 2011, for example, clearly disprove the commonly held view that Ireland was untouched by the Renaissance, the editors would be the first to admit weaknesses in coverage.1 Each volume, in fact, contains only four chapters on the Gaelic world. Emmet O’ Byrne’s contribution describing the efforts of the Tudor state to tighten

in Dublin
The role of Dublin in James Yonge’s Memoriale (1412)
Theresa O’Byrne

Yeftis yewyth to Rymoris othyr any Suche losyngeris, for thay Praysith hare yeueris be thay neuer So vicious. Who-so ham any good yewyth brekyth the statutis of kylkeny, and he is acursid by a xi bisschopis, as the same Statutes makyth mencion.5 While Yonge does not directly name native Irish poets, his reference to the Statutes of Kilkenny makes the association clear. The Statutes of Kilkenny sought, among other things, to shore up Anglo-Irish culture against the threat of acculturation and to regulate Anglo-Irish commerce and communication with the Gaelic-Irish

in Dublin
David Heffernan

united in opposition to the Gaelic-Irish and Old English communities.8 In keeping with this, the period is also   8 The following are just some of the more prominent examples from amongst the numerous studies which have drawn such a conclusion: Nicholas Canny, The formation of the Old English elite in Ireland (Dublin, 1975); Brendan Bradshaw, ‘Sword, word and strategy in the Reformation in Ireland’, The Historical Journal 21:3 (1978), pp. 475–502; Nicholas Canny, ‘Edmund Spenser and the development of an Anglo-Irish identity’, The Yearbook of English Studies 13

in Dublin
Andrew Hadfield

–2000 (Cambridge, 2002), ch. 1. GRIBBEN 9781526113245 PRINT.indd 63 20/04/2017 15:33 64 Andrew Hadfield of hierarchy, and a proclamation of collective privilege’, very similar to the civic pageants in Elizabethan London.43 These processions and public performances often expressed Dublin’s complex sense of itself, caught between Gaelic Ireland and imperial England, uneasily negotiating a sense of identity between the two. They also suggest that Dublin would have seemed more obviously connected to the past than many English cities and it is not clear how vigorously medieval

in Dublin
Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin

volume contains Colm Lennon’s essay on Peter White’s school in Kilkenny, alerting the reader to the practicalities of the language learning which makes scholarship and translation possible, and Clare Carroll’s account of Irish clerics in Rome who were in the thick of sophisticated theological arguments but also preserved and furthered Gaelic linguistic scholarship. Lennon’s research on the culture of the English-speaking Pale complements Mícheál Mac Craith’s and Brendan Bradshaw’s on Gaelic Ireland, while Carroll’s points to a well-equipped diaspora.5  2 Crown surveys

in Dublin
Abstract only
Writing for the stage in Restoration Dublin
Stephen Austin Kelly

therefore forgive his and others’ past 22 The term ‘Mere Irish’ was not, as it is sometimes supposed, a pejorative term. ‘Mere’ in this context means ‘pure-blooded’ or ‘whole’ and was used to distinguish the Gaelic Irish from the English-Irish or Old English. The dismissive connotation of ‘mere’ in the contemporary sense (as in, for example, the phrase ‘a mere child’) did not exist in the early modern period. 23 John Kerrigan, ‘Boyle’s Ireland and the British problem, 1641–1679’, in David J. Baker and Willy Maley (eds), British identities and English Renaissance

in Dublin
Alan Bryson

. after 1566). She perhaps knew him through Thynne, who was a friend and fellow evangelical. St Loe came from the senior gentry of Somerset, was a wealthy and successful soldier, and one of Elizabeth I’s most trusted servants and captain of the guard. About forty at the time, he was well educated, intelligent, charming, active and generous.36 ‘A man of grett hope: whose hardy, painfull, discrett, chargeable, and co[n]tynuall, good service’ was commended by the lord deputy of Ireland, St Loe could be ruthless, as when he defeated Gaelic Irish rebels in late summer 1548

in Bess of Hardwick
Raymond Gillespie

Stouthamer-Loeber, ‘Books owned by members of Old English and Gaelic Irish families in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries’, in Michael Potterton and Thomas Herron (eds), Dublin and the Pale in the Renaissance, c.1540–1640 (Dublin, 2011), pp. 286–8. 36 Raymond Gillespie, ‘The social thought of Richard Bellings’, in Micheál Ó Siochrú (ed.), Kingdoms in crisis: Ireland in the 1640s (Dublin, 2001), pp. 212–28. See also Coolahan’s chapter in this volume. GRIBBEN 9781526113245 PRINT.indd 47 20/04/2017 15:33 48 Raymond Gillespie fitfully.37 The response to older works

in Dublin
The scholarly achievements of Sir James Ware
Mark Empey

litmus test for reciprocal admiration of ‘opposing’ groups was Ware’s relationship with key figures in Gaelic Ireland. The existence of these important nationwide contacts has already been established, but his association with the distinguished Gaelic scholar Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh from Sligo merits particular attention. After returning to Dublin following the collapse of the Cromwellian regime, Ware immediately immersed himself in Irish sources in an effort to complete various projects which had been interrupted during the Interregnum. 62 Cunningham and Gillespie

in Dublin