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Steven Peacock

in contemporary society. Political discourse is deeply embedded in the pieces, as they raise pertinent questions of international responsibility, civic duty, humanism, and humanitarianism. After the current craze for all things Scandinavian – from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo to The Killing and the knitted jumpers worn by its central protagonist Sarah Lund, to Michelin-starred Danish restaurants – has inevitably died away, Sweden’s place in the world as expressed artistically in film and television (or film-as-television) will, I predict, remain tantalisingly

in Swedish crime fiction
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Patterns of support, negotiation and opposition
Piers Robinson, Peter Goddard, Katy Parry, Craig Murray, and Philip M. Taylor

support to the idea that the elite-driven model becomes less applicable as we move away from major war fighting circumstances. With respect to the explanatory variables associated with the elite-driven model – patriotism, the ideology of humanitarianism and, to a lesser extent, reliance upon official sources – these were all found to be relevant in helping to explain why so much coverage was supportive. Here, emerging from our findings are important implications for the importance of news sources and media management relative to patriotism, the impact of new technology

in Pockets of resistance
Evidence for supportive coverage and the elite-driven model
Piers Robinson, Peter Goddard, Katy Parry, Craig Murray, and Philip M. Taylor

and humanitarianism in shaping coverage. ‘Lapdogs to the coalition’: evidence for supportive coverage during the invasion period Heavy reliance upon coalition sources As detailed in Chapter 3, a major feature of the elite-driven model is the propensity of news media to rely overwhelmingly on official sources, in particular under conditions of war. Our findings for sources used in both television and press conform closely to this pattern and show a clear tendency towards a supportive mode of reporting from 20 March onwards. For television coverage, the coalition was

in Pockets of resistance
The origins, characteristics and theoretical foundation of the nineteenth-century French realist, and naturalist tradition
Ian Aitken

’, ‘classic perfection’, ‘peaceful universalism’ and ‘rational humanitarianism’. 12 However, those same practitioners were influenced also by some of the more disturbing aspects of the period which they lived through, and this was also to shape the evolution of the ‘true style’. By the time that the ‘true style’ came to prominence in the 1780s, for example, the heroic providentialist ideals of the early

in Realist film theory and cinema
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From Les Bronzes to Ridicule
Lisa Downing

estate and stop his peasants dying of fever. However, appeals to humanitarianism do not work at the Court, which prizes one currency alone: wit. He soon discovers that the ability to ridicule the other verbally, while avoiding ridicule oneself, is the only way to impress. With Ridicule , Leconte finally created a film that would recoup acclaim from audiences, academics and the draconian French critics

in Patrice Leconte
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Steve Chibnall

. The act of emasculation – the disabling of the guns – is carried out not so much in the strategic pursuit of military victory but as an act of humanitarianism which will allow the evacuation of British forces on a neighbouring island. Although the 2,000 servicemen trapped on Kheros will clearly be useful in the future prosecution of the war, their function in the film is primarily symbolic, to stand in opposition to the guns

in J. Lee Thompson
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Steve Chibnall

case against von Braun is represented initially by his fiancée Maria (Victoria Shaw) who is jealous of his commitment to space exploration and questions his humanitarianism. Later in the film, his chief critic is an American officer Taggert (James Daley) who has lost his wife and child in a V-2 attack. This character, according to Lee Thompson ( 1960 ), is ‘a “composite” of many influential people in America who still hold the view that von Braun

in J. Lee Thompson
Christopher Lloyd

but Vorzet. While Vorzet’s unexplored despair and mischievous penmanship lead to him having his throat cut, the jaundiced but honest Germain (whose brusqueness hides a cynical humanitarianism, it seems) is reconciled by these troubling events to accept human weakness and his union with the sluttish Denise. Although virtue thus seems finally to win against vice, both Vorzet and Germain are revealed to have a dual identity, and for much of the film Germain appears to be a rather unsympathetic, self-righteous figure, whereas Vorzet seems more worldly wise and tolerant

in Henri-Georges Clouzot
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Martin O’Shaughnessy

exploited status, is dazzled by her master’s literary prose and is happy to marry Boudu when he wins the lottery. Of class conflict there is no sign. Faulkner suggests that the film’s radicalism is strictly limited. It highlights petty conventions and undermines myths of humanitarianism and cultural guardianship, but distracts attention from the bourgeoisie’s exploitative relationship with other social groups

in Jean Renoir
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Film, history and the Spanish Civil War
David Archibald

‘progress’ associated with an Enlightenment view of the past. His position, in one sense, is closer to that postulated by Marxist historians who have highlighted the negative side of historical development. Theodor Adorno, for instance, asserts that ‘No universal history leads from savagery to humanitarianism, but there is one leading from the slingshot to the megaton bomb . . . the One and All that keeps rolling on to this day – with occasional breathing spells – would teleologically be the absolute of suffering’. (quoted in Eagleton, 1996 : 50) But White’s perspective

in The war that won't die