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Sam Rohdie

origini’, ‘The Voyage’ / ‘Il viaggio’, ‘Across Europe’ / ‘Attraverso l’Europa’. ‘Le origini’ takes place in Iran. It begins with Fire, the burning off of natural gas as a by-product of oil drilling. The burning off is at the top of towers in a mountainous terrain. The gas is set alight by gun-flares at night, like a pistol shot followed by a mini explosion at ignition. The film opens with the gas burned off, a coup de théâtre. The burning is part of the extraction process, but the visual effect seems a fantasy like the story of Aladdin and his magic lamp in One Thousand

in Film modernism
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Alan Rosenthal

1989, where one lone man confronted a squadron of Chinese tanks. Antony asks ‘Who was he? What accounts for his actions?’ Like Princess the story opens up to discuss the suppression of history. This battle against an oppressive regime was followed by a similar expose in 2010 in For Neda, which may be Antony’s saddest and most moving film. As the world came to know, Neda Agha-Soltan was shot by a sniper while protesting over Iran’s rigged elections, but had her Inspiration tragic death captured on multiple cell phones. Quickly she became a key symbol of protest

in The documentary diaries
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Alan Rosenthal

. This means a good story, conflict, characters that interest us, scenes that touch us and move us, and a conclusion and closure. Occasionally you strike lucky and can sense many of these things before you begin your film. In Fahimeh’s Story, this is exactly what happened to director Faramarz K-Rahber and his line producer Axel Grigor. Before shooting, both men met a vivacious forty-seven-year-old Iranian immigrant to Australia called Fahimeh. Fahimeh had migrated to Australia with her children after an unhappy arranged marriage to a husband whom she could not divorce

in The documentary diaries
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Alison Smith

) Daguerréotypes 1974–5, 80 min., col. Production: Ciné-Tamaris, INA, ZDF Camera: Nurith Aviv, William Lubtchansky Editing: Gordon Swire Sound: Antoine Bonfanti, Jean-François Auger With the participation of the inhabitants of the rue Daguerre and Mystag Réponse de femmes 1975, 8 min., col. Production: Ciné-Tamaris, Antenne 2 Executive producers: Sylvie Genevoix, Michel Honorin Camera: Jacques Reiss, Michel Thiriet Sound: Bernard Bleicher Editing: Marie Castro Plaisir d’amour en Iran 1976, 6 min., col. Production: Ciné-Tamaris Camera

in Agnès Varda
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Alison Smith

successful protest singer and performance artist, always preoccupied with women’s problems. After a career setback she briefly moves to Iran with her Iranian boyfriend Darius, gets married there but rejects the repressive traditions which even the apparently liberated Darius drifts back to, and returns to France and to her old life, pregnant with her second child but self-sufficient. Compared with L’Opéra-Mouffe, Cléo and

in Agnès Varda
Alison Smith

fundamentally flawed, in Lions’ Love carefully constructed and maintained, in L’Une chante, l’autre pas , the most optimistic of the three, the result of hard work and underpinned by a serious purpose. In the sequences of L’Une chante, l’autre pas where Pomme (the one who sings) leaves for Iran with her partner Darius, the connotation deepens and broadens – no longer the individual idyll of the snapshot

in Agnès Varda
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Queering Islam and micropolitical disorientation
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

West, and they remain a contentious issue in many Muslim-majority countries, where levels of tolerance can vary between clandestine social acceptance and exemplary state punishment. Whereas homosexuality has been decriminalised in places such as Turkey and Indonesia – while in India it has been decriminalised, recriminalised, and decriminalised once again – stepping out of line with normative sexualities can lead many Muslims to face imprisonment or even the death penalty, in countries such as Malaysia, Nigeria, Iran, and Saudi Arabia (Habib, 2010 ). Whether these

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
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Popular song in the films of Pedro Almodóvar
Eric M. Thau

the settings and attitudes of la movida , he himself sings the two most important songs, ‘Gran Ganga’ (Big Deal) and ‘Suck it to me’, with his punk/drag band partner Fanny McNamara. While both songs are diegetic, as their band performs live, the former relates directly to the plot line with its references to Riza (Imanol Arias), the ‘Tiranian’ whose conjoined status and nationality (tyrant and Iranian) offers a play on

in Screening songs in Hispanic and Lusophone cinema
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Brian McFarlane and Deane Williams

‘we return to film’s origins, to the Lumière brothers, that is, back to current events and journalism when the dramatic force of real events was sufficient to drive a story forward’. 4 As suggested above, In This World is a road movie, and the film also emphasises the danger, tedium, and the enormity of the distances travelled by the refugees Jamal and Enayatullah. Shot in Pakistan, Iran, Turkey

in Michael Winterbottom
Matrilinearity, Sufism, and l’errance in the autofictional works of Abdellah Taïa
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

consciousness. Taïa’s writing explores two interrelated strands of Islamicate homophobia: the systemic form that exists in Arab societies at a mundane level, and the state’s official repression of homosexuality, best embodied by the character of Motjaba, the exiled gay Iranian in Taïa’s Un pays pour mourir (A country to die in), which signals Taïa’s consciousness about the precarious plights of queer citizens in the Middle East. Taïa’s autofiction focuses most keenly on the former strand, as his autofictional characters face the hardships of

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film