Search results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • "Irish culture" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Cara Delay

children even as they made use of their maternal status to demand that priests and bishops respond to their needs and wants. As Irish culture increasingly identified women with the home and the private sphere, as Catholic devotions gained favour throughout Ireland, and as household prayers increased in popularity in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Irish women welcomed their new role as guardian of religion in the home. How this worked in practice, though, remains obscure. Chapter  Four, ‘The holy household’, offers a case study of the Irish Catholic

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Abstract only
Cara Delay

Virgin Mary’ that fundamentally was designed to prepare them for ‘a life of Christian service to others’, and specifically for Catholic wifehood and motherhood.55 In convent schools, education privileged ‘the embourgeoisement of Irish culture with missionary conviction’, focusing on ‘ladylike modesty and refinement’ as well as ‘inculcating middle-class values of female propriety in young girls’.56 Still, however, through education and the influence of their nuns, who served as role models, some girls learned the confidence that they would later use to contest women

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Abstract only
Cara Delay

Mary and Christ. Irish culture from 1850 to 1950 consistently articulated that women were central actors in the home, maintaining that the home, as a religious space, was the domain of the bean an tí  (woman of the house). In the post-famine decades, however, as the rhetoric of idealised the holy household 143 Catholic womanhood increased, so too did expectations for women in the domestic sphere. And by the early twentieth century, as print and material culture exploded and cities and suburbs grew, women’s responsibilities in the home intertwined with purchasing

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Cara Delay

Ireland: A Century of Change (Belfast: The Blackstaff Press, 2003), p. 30. 31 Cork Examiner, 22 November 1922, cited in Louise Ryan, Gender, Identity, and the Irish Press, 1922–1937: Embodying the Nation (Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 2002), pp. 151–2. 32 Gerardine Meaney, ‘Sex and nation: Women in Irish culture and politics’, in A Dozen Lips, ed. Ailbhe Smyth (Dublin: Attic Press, 1994), p.  191. See also Gerardine Meaney, Gender, Ireland, and Cultural Change: Race, Sex, and Nation (New York, NY: Routledge, 2010), p. 3. 33 Lawrence J. McCaffrey, ‘Irish

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Abstract only
Cara Delay

the resulting community the ‘chapel-village’.85 By creating a new religious landscape based on the chapel, the Irish hierarchy not only reclaimed space; it also defined the new civilising agenda of the Church. The spatial elements of the ‘devotional revolution’ had a clear impact on Irish Catholic women’s lives; indeed, the ordering of chapel space resembled the regulation of the female body in traditional Irish culture. At times, certain women were banned from religious occasions or mass on Sunday. In her nineties, Peig Minihane of Kerry remembered of her childhood

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950