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Karagöz’s cultural and linguistic migration
Annedith Schneider

reference to Jacques Chirac’s infamous comments in 1991 concerning an ‘overdose’ of immigrants, whom he stereotypically described as having too many children, making too much noise and cooking foods with odours offensive to their French neighbours (Le Puill 1991). Beyond such easy targets as exploitative employers and anti-immigrant political rhetoric, Yıldız’s plays represent a further step, in that they also call on immigrants to think critically about their own attitudes and behaviour. Such a self-critique may suggest another opening for immigrant communities. The

in Turkish immigration, art and narratives of home in France
Michael Byers

But on this occasion it used its political influence to bolster the claim, with President Bill Clinton phoning Tony Blair, Jacques Chirac and German Chancellor Helmut Kohl shortly before the missile strikes to ask for their support. Without having time to consult their legal experts, all three agreed – and made concurring public statements immediately after the U.S. action. As a result of these quick expressions of support by three influential states, other countries were more restrained in their responses than they might have been. This in turn helped obfuscate the

in ‘War on terror’
Shailja Sharma

titles suggest, urged a move away from repentance and towards pride in the French nation. Pascal Bruckner, a philosopher, also joined in this trend, publishing his book La Tyrannie de la pénitence (2006) insisting that that France should escape its thrall to the ‘tyrannie de la pénitence’ (tyranny of guilt) and regain its place in the world. Therefore Sarkozy came to power supported by a groundswell of intellectual and popular support and a determination to move away from Jacques Chirac’s policies of accepting state responsibility for its history, unpalatable as it may

in Postcolonial minorities in Britain and France
The backlash against multiculturalism
Shailja Sharma

is true that some of Honeyford’s claims about self-segregation were quite inflammatory, his main point, that multicultural piety produces bad educational attainment and insufficient acculturation, has been borne out since the mid-1980s.  2 For a good historical account, see Asari et al. (2008).  3 Gaullism traditionally stands for a strong role for the state in economic affairs (dirigisme) and international affairs (a nuclear France), and for a strongly conservative approach in matters dealing with immigration and French overseas possessions. Both Jacques Chirac

in Postcolonial minorities in Britain and France