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Mark Webber

absent, however, from the EU. Of all the candidate countries for membership, Turkey has been the most long-standing and the most controversial. The opening of formal membership negotiations in October 2005 has failed to resolve the debate on Turkey’s relative merits. French President Jacques Chirac, for one, noted shortly after the December 2004 European Council which agreed to open talks that ‘[n

in Inclusion, exclusion and the governance of European Security
Charlotte Wagnsson

Europe – with its values, identity and principles – as a necessary component in a multipolar world order. 76 The transformation of the EU was portrayed as a necessary step towards a safer world. 77 The French President, Jacques Chirac, argued that the strengthening of Europe, including of its military element, was essential to the global balance. 78 Adopting a global perspective, the EU focused

in Security in a greater Europe
Charlotte Wagnsson

September 2001, the President of France, Jacques Chirac, referred to France’s particular aptitude for grasping cultural divergences and forging cohesion despite differences. Throughout all three crises, the French leaders focused on preserving the global security community that was guaranteed by the UN. Conclusion: norms in their own right or as resources for community

in Security in a greater Europe
Abstract only
A precedent?
Charlotte Wagnsson

problem as closely connected to the perceived threat of unilateralism. Jacques Chirac echoed the Russian standpoint that NATO should not be given UN authority to intervene around the world because such a development could dismantle the post-World War II international order. Moreover, the French leaders referred to the need to offer an alternative to the unipolar world. Like the Russians, Chirac protested

in Security in a greater Europe
Mark Webber

result in its elimination. With the end of the Cold War, many leading Western politicians (Helmut Kohl in Germany, John Major in the UK, Bill Clinton in the US and Jacques Chirac in France) still proceeded, to some degree, from assumptions derived from the superpower status of Russia’s Soviet predecessor. Yet the passage of time means that the Soviet factor is of less and less

in Inclusion, exclusion and the governance of European Security
A child of the Kosovo crisis?
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

as the most determined to see the WEU develop real operational capabilities and roles; to the detriment, some suspected, of NATO itself. A developing France-NATO rapprochement , begun under Mitterrand but especially evident from 1995 under his successor Jacques Chirac, thus had the consequence of helping to ensure that momentum was lost in the operational development of the WEU. 19 This is not to say that the WEU was simply

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

is now done’. 18 French President Jacques Chirac asserted that what was at stake was ‘peace in Europe’ and ‘human rights’. 19 German Chancellor Gerhard Schröder argued that the ‘Alliance wants to stop serious, systematic human rights violations and prevent a humanitarian catastrophe in Kosovo’. 20 In providing a rationale for military action, NATO and its member states made clear that exhaustion of

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
David Brown

Jorg Monar, ‘Maintaining the Justice and Home Affairs acquis in an enlarged Europe’, in Apap (ed.), Justice and Home Affairs in the European Union , p. 49. 25 President George W. Bush, joint news conference with President Jacques Chirac (Washington, 6 November 2001), http://archives.cnn.com/2001/US/11/06/ret

in The security dimensions of EU enlargement