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Aesthetico-political misprision in Derricke’s A Discoverie of Woodkarne
Thomas Cartelli

polyscenic frames, which, as in the present instance, invite viewers to assume or imagine both continuous connections and discontinuous collisions between juxtaposed actions or events. In so doing, I plan to apply to these scenes an understanding of the ‘aesthetico-political’ – a term Jacques Rancière and others employ to identify aesthetic transactions that cross and complicate established orders of reason and channels of perception – that mainly signifies a politically motivated and ideologically informed aesthetic choice

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
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Shakespeare’s voyage to Greece
Richard Wilson

–9. 61 Jacques Rancière, The Emancipated Spectator , trans. Gregory Elliott (London: Verso, 2009), pp 122–3; Judith Halberstam, The Queer Art of Failure (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2011), pp. 60, 80 et passim. 62 Hugh Grady, Shakespeare and Impure

in Free Will
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Shakespeare’s brute part
Richard Wilson

’s instruction would have been like that of the eighteenth-century teacher praised by Jacques Rancière in The Ignorant Schoolmaster , who encouraged pupils to ‘get lost’ in their very confusion, rather than cramming them with knowledge and ‘having them repeat it like parrots’, on the subversive principle he announced: ‘I must teach you that I have nothing to teach you’. 85

in Free Will
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The echoes of Rome in Julius Caesar
Richard Wilson

,1,2–5 ] Why do intellectuals make so much of shoemakers? asks Jacques Rancière. The answer he gives in The Philosopher and His Poor is that the shoemaker figures as the archetypal artisan, who because his work never advances beyond mere repetition can appreciate only spectacle, and understands neither art nor tragedy. The first thinker to break this stereotype, according to Rancie re was Wagner, when

in Free Will
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The visual turn in Antony and Cleopatra
Richard Wilson

the closer one sat to him the better one’s view, but ‘only the king’s place was perfect’. 57 With its switch from light to dark, and climactic dance when performers and spectators joined hands, a masque was thus the fulfilment of what Shakespeare’s Caesar has in mind, and Jacques Rancière describes in The Emancipated Spectator as a Platonist theatre to end theatre

in Free Will
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Richard Wilson

one of symbolic representation. At the same time, I suggest, Shakespeare’s human comedy ‘bodies forth’ [ Dream, 5,1,14 ] all the twists of presence and representation traced by theorists such as Jacques Rancière. For while an author may rejoice that ‘the free breath of a sacred king’ [ John, 3,1,74 ] has but ‘a little scene, / To monarchize’ [ Richard II, 3

in Free Will
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Mark Robson

, does not. As Jacques Rancière notes, the Aristotelian distinction between human and animal can only be the result of a rather unlikely forgetting of Plato. In particular, it involves suppressing the passages in the Republic that are all too clear on the animalistic nature of crowds who, at the instigation of an orator, will express pleasure and displeasure. 11 Rancière argues

in The sense of early modern writing
Mark Robson

Minnesota Press, 1978 ). 44 This notion of partage has been central to the recent work of both Jean-Luc Nancy and Jacques Rancière. See, for example, Nancy, The Inoperative Community , trans. P. Connor and others (Minneapolis, Minnesota University Press, 1991 ); La

in The sense of early modern writing
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Sir Thomas More
Mark Robson

–302. 7 See the discussion of this in terms of the work of Jacques Rancière below, pp. 123–4. 8 Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus , ed. E. M. Waith (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984 ). 9 It is hard to avoid the

in The sense of early modern writing