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Renaissance city of literature

From its Nobel laureates to its literary festivals, modern-day Dublin lives up to its role as a literary capital. The question of whether Ireland experienced a cultural and literary Renaissance has received increasing scholarly attention in recent years. This book extends the discussion by engaging with the specific literary culture of its capital city. It begins with an argument for the internationalised literary culture of late medieval Dublin by an analysis of James Yonge's 'Memoriale'. The citizens of Dublin engaged with and actively read texts imported from London, as Dublin's own printing was limited. The book presents case studies that establish Dublin as an emerging city of Renaissance literature by focusing on Edmund Spenser's political and social connections and by examining the literature of complaint emanating from late Elizabethan Dublin. It analyses the constructed authorial personae of Richard Bellings, James Shirley and Henry Burnell residing in Dublin, and discusses the concepts of literary friendship. Sir James Ware's scholarly achievements are analysed and his extensive intellectual community are investigated, revealing an open-minded Dublin community. In addition to being a representative Renaissance activity, translation was harnessed in the country as an 'instrument of state', as shown by translations of Gaelic poetry. The Renaissance literary production in Dublin had a multi-linguistic character with Latin orations taking place in the Trinity College Dublin. The book also addresses the question of whether the English-language drama composed and staged in Restoration Dublin is most accurately described as Anglo-Irish drama or 'English drama written in Ireland'.

Shirley’s and Davenant’s protectorate entertainments
Rachel Willie

known to have been performed for a diplomat during the commonwealth period follows the Stuart convention of printing a brochure through which the physical entertainment can be remembered. James Shirley’s Cupid and Death was performed and first printed in 1653. Thomas Jordan’s Cupid his Coronation was performed the following year in a non-court setting, but the state papers are frustratingly silent about these entertainments.8 Unlike their Jacobean and Caroline predecessors, commonwealth ‘court’ masques do not appear to be well documented. Cupid and Death is thus of

in Staging the revolution
Richard Bellings, James Shirley and Henry Burnell
Marie-Louise Coolahan

5 Renaissance Dublin and the construction of literary authorship: Richard Bellings, James Shirley and Henry Burnell Marie-Louise Coolahan That quintessentially Renaissance literary project – the ­humanist ­dialogue translated – was apparently undertaken in Dublin in the early 1580s by the colonial administrator and writer Lodowick Bryskett. Not published until 1606, Bryskett’s A discourse of civill life (adapted from the Italian Giambattista Giraldi Cinthio’s Tre dialoghi della vita civile of 1565) was careful to represent its author at the centre of another

in Dublin
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Silvia Granata

, and economic discourses that did much to foster the hobby, endowing it with further resonance and meaning. However, I also suggest that such density of expectations might have contributed to the demise of the vogue, as early enthusiasts often put too much weight on it. A reading of James Shirley Hibberd’s The Book of the Aquarium (1856; 1860) allows us to explore the tension between the status of the tank as a commodity and its ambiguous nature as an object whose purpose was to contain living (and particularly fragile) beings. The second part of the chapter

in The Victorian aquarium
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Of 1647, theatre closure and reinvention
Rachel Willie

delivery of) lines affected the nuances of the piece. The politics of Restoration drama are therefore fragmented, but the interplay between past and present on the Restoration stage is also of note. In the commendatory poems to Edward Howard’s unsuccessful play The Six Day’s Adventure or the New Utopia, Aphra Behn and Edward Ravenscroft favourably compared Howard’s work to Jonson’s and Samuel Clyat envisioned a time when Howard would supplant Beaumont and Fletcher. Other writers were less complimentary and accused Howard of borrowing too heavily from James Shirley. What

in Staging the revolution
Silvia Granata

-It-Yourself approach: for the true aquarist, this was part of the pleasure, allowing him not only to prove his technical skills, but also to create a tank of his own liking. As noted by Judith Hamera, the possibility to indulge the owner’s idiosyncrasies in the planning and realisation of the tank was one of the key features of the hobby. 44 Unlike today’s aquaria, Victorian ones often displayed remarkably ornate designs, in tune with the rest of the furniture. Figure 1 ‘Aquarium and fernery combined’, in James Shirley Hibberd, Rustic Adornments for Homes of Taste

in The Victorian aquarium
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Naomi Baker

she sat close by Vulcan’. 44 In James Shirley’s play The Dukes Mistris (1636, publ. 1638), an ugly woman is hired because she is ‘Usefull at Court, to set of[f] other faces,/Especially the Duke’s Mistres’. 45 The seventeenth-century female fashion of wearing artificial spots or moles was similarly generated by the belief, in the words of one critic of the practice, that ‘contraries compared and

in Plain ugly
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Silvia Granata

, and on a not-so-distant future. Chapter 3 examines the multifaceted aesthetic appeal that the home tank exerted on Victorians. The analysis of James Shirley Hibberd’s The Book of the Aquarium reveals how the tank was conceptualised as a mirror of its owner, situating tank keeping within a cluster of social, moral, and economic discourses that did much to foster the hobby, endowing it with further resonance and meaning. Nevertheless, such density of expectations might have contributed to the demise of the vogue. The second part of the chapter focuses on texts by

in The Victorian aquarium
Praising ugliness
Naomi Baker

subsequently be celebrated. ‘Fairing the foul’: 25 the deformed mistress ‘Away with handsome faces,’ opens James Shirley’s ‘To a Beautiful Lady’, ‘let me see/ Hereafter nothing but deformity.’ 26 Possibly written for Horatio, a character with a perverse predilection for ugly women in Shirley’s The Dukes Mistris , the

in Plain ugly
Ekphrasis and mortality in Andrew Marvell
Keith McDonald

enemies’ eyes. Lovely and admirable as he was, Yet was his sword or armour all his glass. Nor in his mistress’ eyes that joy he took, As in an enemy’s himself to look. (‘An Elegy Upon the Death of My Lord Francis Villiers’, 51–4) The celebration of Villiers’ military acumen towards the end of the poem is preceded by this reflection on his almost charming vanity, which is playfully suggested as the route of his downfall.21 Marvell may have borrowed here from ‘Narcissus, or the Self-Lover’ by James Shirley, who, alongside Thomas Stanley, a possible patron of Marvell’s at

in Ekphrastic encounters