Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for :

  • "John Derricke" x
  • Manchester Shakespeare x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Essays on text and context

This collection of sixteen essays, the first devoted to John Derricke’s work, offers new readings of, and new sources behind, The Image of Irelande: With a Discoverie of Woodkarne (1581), all to better explicate facets of this difficult and complex book. While prior scholarship on Derricke was largely confined to commentary on the illustrations, the essays in this volume encompass a broad range of approaches to the Image of Irelande in its entirety. Although on the face of it, The Image is blatantly pro-Sidney and anti-Irish propaganda, and has always been so received, the essays in this collection combine to suggest that Derricke’s book is in fact far more culturally and politically daring than has been assumed, with a highly sophisticated textual and visual presentation only now brought into focus. In addition to scrutinizing Derricke’s poetic and iconographic practices, the essays include insights from architecture and archaeology, print history and reading practices, studies of civic display and colonial ideologies. The collection, divided into five sections (Ideologies, Archaeologies, Print and publication, Influences, and Interpretations), establishes a basis on which to build future analyses of Derricke’s enigmatic book.

William O’Neil

In the study of Elizabethan literature, little attention has been paid to the parallels between John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande and Edmund Spenser’s Book Five of The Faerie Queene . In each of these works the author praises through a heroic narrative a lord deputy of Ireland who was recalled from office in disgrace. With England’s ongoing efforts to control Ireland, Derricke and Spenser mark their main character’s approach to governance through the representation of the sword of state versus the

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Abstract only
Thomas Herron, Denna J. Iammarino, and Maryclaire Moroney

The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne (1581), by John Derricke, 1 merits more sustained critical attention than it has received so far. It is a fascinating, multivalent text published in London by John Day and dedicated to Sir Philip Sidney, the most prominent figure of a famous English family whose mid-Tudor patriarch, Sir Henry Sidney, was three times governor of Ireland and the protagonist of Derricke’s book. The Image brazenly advertises military atrocity in the name of religious zealotry

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Discovering the formal and figurative texture of Derricke’s Image of Irelande
Matthew Woodcock

Little has been written to date about the formal, stylistic and rhetorical aspects of John Derricke’s Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne (hereafter Image ). Those critics who do mention the use of poetry in the text, rather than its ethnographic content or those superlative woodcuts, are almost universally contemptuous about Derricke’s writing. The word ‘doggerel’ seems to be an obligatory feature of any discussion of Derricke’s versifying, and among modern commentators his poetry is

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Martial identities and the subject of conquest in Derricke’s Image of Irelande
Maryclaire Moroney

John Derricke’s Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne (1581) famously features a sequence of woodcuts purporting to illustrate a series of military engagements between Irish troops and the forces commanded by Sir Henry Sidney, Lord Deputy of Ireland during the later 1570s. The images have long been used by historians and literary scholars to illustrate studies of Elizabethan Ireland, and to that end, the woodcuts have been scrutinised for their accuracy in depicting Irish clothing, hairstyles

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Abstract only
Derricke, Dürer, and Foxe
Thomas Herron

The sources and aesthetic principles behind the famous woodcuts to John Derricke’s 1 Image of Irelande: with a discoverie of Woodkarne (London 1581) are not well understood. The woodcuts – like the long multi-part, multi-genre poem that accompanies them – denigrate native Irish culture and leaders while celebrating the military campaigns of Sir Henry Sidney, three-times Lord Deputy of Ireland, against his foes. The work is dedicated to Henry’s son, the poet Philip, and is often cited as a classic

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Derricke, paratext, and poetic reception
Denna J. Iammarino

In his 1809 introduction to John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne (1581), Sir Walter Scott, the work’s first modern editor, assesses the literary quality of the poem, among other factors. Scott alludes to its chaotic structure, commenting on how ‘The wit and propriety of this allegory, it is difficult to discover; and indeed it is probable that the author, like better poets, being determined to say something fine, was indifferent whether it were comprehensible or not.’ 1

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Derricke’s Image of Irelande and the Mirror for Magistrates tradition
Scott Lucas

John Derricke’s Image of Irelande , principally composed in 1578 but not published until 1581, is a multi-faceted work that weaves history, topography, pseudo-anthropology, and engagements with contemporary political events into a distinctive presentation of the Irish people and the often brutal conflicts that marked Elizabethan attempts to impose English sovereignty over them. Scholars have long noted Derricke’s highly literary presentation of his material: the poetic form in which he casts much of his

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Print culture, multimodality, and visual design in Derricke’s Image of Irelande
Andie Silva

The illustrations from John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with the Discoverie of Woodkarne (1581) are often featured in history and anthropology books as some of the earliest and most detailed early modern visual accounts of Irish custom and culture. 2 These twelve visually stunning plates showcase a unique combination of form and design: in addition to representing multiple events, people, and places within the same visual space of a broadside page, each of the plates includes, under the

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Violence, masculinity, and the colonial project in Derricke’s Image of Irelande
John Soderberg

Introduction A fundamental insight of recent scholarship on John Derricke’s Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne is that, rather than being simply a justification of conquest, the poem and accompanying woodcut illustrations are fully entangled in the contradictions and anxieties of Elizabethan Ireland and colonial encounters more generally. 1 Colonial powers often imagine indigenous people as victims of unbridled lust and perpetrators of reckless violence. Likewise, colonial powers

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne