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Christian Kaunert

The Lisbon Treaty and the constitutionalisation of the European Union When final result showed 67.1 per cent of Irish voters in favour of the Lisbon Treaty, with 32.9 per cent voting against, Irish political elites were visibly relieved. Irish Taoiseach Brian Cowen celebrated that ‘today we have done the right thing for our own future and the future of our children

in European internal security
Towards supranational governance in the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice

The European Commission had become one of the more contentious actors during both Irish referenda on the Lisbon Treaty. This book discusses the role of the European Commission and institutions more generally, as well as the policy area of justice and home affairs. It argues that it is important to evaluate the role of EU institutions for the process of European integration. The book suggests a reconceptualisation of the framework of supranational policy entrepreneurs (SPEs), which is often referred to by the academic literature that discusses the role of agency in European integration. It focuses on the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice (AFSJ) at the policy and treaty levels; primarily on four grounds: academic literature, SPE behaviour, EU's policymaking, and the interplay between treaty negotiations and policy-making. To analyse the role of the European institutions, the book combines an analysis of the Lisbon Treaty in relation to the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice with an analysis of the policy-making in the same area. The public policy model by John Kingdon with constructivist international relations literature is also outlined. The external dimension of counter-terrorism in the EU; the role of the EU institutions in EU asylum and migration; and the role of he Common European Asylum System (CEAS) is discussed. The book also analyses the role of the EU institutions in the communitarisation of the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice, in the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, and thus subsequently in the Lisbon Treaty.

Ana E. Juncos

Despite successive treaty reforms, the CFSP remains obstinately intergovernmental, at least on paper. The member states retain a veto power in the decision-making process given that unanimity is the rule within the CFSP, and QMV the exception, even after the ratification of the Lisbon Treaty. However, over the years, it is possible to see a move beyond intergovernmentalism. In this chapter

in EU Foreign and Security Policy in Bosnia
Ana E. Juncos

Strategy (European Council, 2008 : 2). Needless to say, many of the institutional reforms that have been introduced in the last decades which were discussed in the previous chapter aimed, to a great extent, at improving CFSP performance, that is, its effectiveness and coherence. For instance, talking about the most recent of such reforms, the Lisbon Treaty, the High Representative for Foreign Affairs and

in EU Foreign and Security Policy in Bosnia
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Ana E. Juncos

member states regarded as pro-Atlanticist or neutral, and thus the number of EU crisis management operations skyrocketed between 2003 and 2010. The (self-)declared success of the crisis management operations deployed by the EU and the ratification of the Lisbon Treaty, which promised to increase the effectiveness of the CSDP, served to raise expectations again (Menon, 2011b ). However, the impact of the

in EU Foreign and Security Policy in Bosnia
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From stabilisation to integration
Ana E. Juncos

This chapter discusses CFSP activities in Bosnia from 2002 to 2011, a period of profound transformation, not only for Bosnia, but also for the EU with the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty in 2009. During this time, the main goal of the EU’s strategy in the country was to move from post-conflict stabilisation to the integration of Bosnia into the Euro-Atlantic structures (EU and NATO). Although

in EU Foreign and Security Policy in Bosnia
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Ana E. Juncos

EU foreign policy from the signing of the Maastricht Treaty in 1991 to later developments such as the addition of the CSDP and the ratification of the Lisbon Treaty. In the book, I investigate the EU’s involvement during the war, but also the range of CFSP tools and instruments deployed after the war to help post-conflict reconstruction and those used more recently by the Union to lead this

in EU Foreign and Security Policy in Bosnia
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Christian Kaunert

‘Thank you, Ireland! It’s a great day for Ireland; it’s a great day for Europe’ ( EUobserver, 3 October 2009). The words of European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso expressed the feelings of many decision-makers in Brussels. Ireland’s strong ‘Yes’ to the Lisbon treaty on 2 October 2009 was greeted with widespread relief in Brussels. ‘The Irish people have spoken

in European internal security
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Towards supranational governance in the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice?
Christian Kaunert

institutional arrangements in these areas, are the expression of a political process attempting to construct such an ‘area’ for different political communities by ensuring their security from external security threats. This threat perception has arguably influenced the negotiations of the Lisbon Treaty, which contains a solidarity clause. This book has further argued that EU institutional

in European internal security
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Robin Wilson

This also puts in perspective the historic, and retrograde, significance of the no vote on the Lisbon treaty in the republic in 2008, as FitzGerald stressed repeatedly in his Irish Times column, and the inevitable political scramble to reverse it in 2009. 33 This of course means that ‘unionism

in The Northern Ireland experience of conflict and agreement