Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
The Aid Industry and the ‘Me Too’ Movement
Charlotte Lydia Riley

created a twitter hashtag, #MeToo, to encourage women to respond to the accusations against Harvey Weinstein by sharing their own experiences of assault and abuse ( Khomami, 2017 ). Since the Weinstein accusations – and through his trial and subsequent conviction – journalists, academics, politicians and activists have spoken of a MeToo moment, as women across many different sectors vocalise their experiences of sexual assault, abuse and harassment at the hands of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Megan Daigle, Sarah Martin, and Henri Myrttinen

international colleagues. This, we argue, is all the more striking in light of the 2018 Oxfam scandal and resurgence of interest in preventing sexual exploitation and abuse (see GADN, 2019 ), as well as the rise of #AidToo and #AidSoWhite which saw aid workers share experiences of sexual violence and racism on social media as part of wider #MeToo and #BlackLivesMatter phenomena since 2013. 3 While the term ‘the field’ – and its more extreme sibling ‘the deep field

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
A Belated but Welcome Theory of Change on Mental Health and Development
Laura Davidson

). Guardian ( 2018 ), ‘ #MeToo Strikes Aid Sector as Sexual Exploitation Allegations Proliferate ’, 12 February, by P. Beaumont and R. Radcliffe , www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/feb/12/metoo-strikes-aid-sector-as-sexual-exploitation-allegations-proliferate (accessed 4 January 2021

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

supposed to be saving, as we have seen with recent #MeToo scandals ( BBC, 2018a ). Also, their commitment to aid might be superficial and based around a narrow idea of life as basic subsistence, for example, rather than of the quality of the lives of those they have saved. But few modern humanitarians are likely to make a moral claim that they will save only the lives of those who look or think like them, a common occurrence in the nineteenth century. All beneficiaries have prima facie equal value. But humanitarians’ reliance on liberal world

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
Valerie Bryson

protests have developed into national movements which in turn have fed into and drawn strength from campaigns in other countries; here the most obvious example is the way that apparently separate protests against sexual violence in Argentina, India and elsewhere have become linked into the #MeToo movement that began in the US. Developments in social media have of course provided unprecedented opportunities for making connections and giving a voice to a much wider range of women than in the past (although it should be remembered that many women in poor countries lack

in The futures of feminism
Valerie Bryson

exaggerated assertion of the aggressiveness associated with ‘normal’ masculinity. More recently, with the ascendancy of Putin and Trump, the apparently unstoppable spread of increasingly violent and extreme material on the internet and the #MeToo revelations, there has been much talk of ‘toxic masculinity’ and its damaging effects on individuals, societies, international relations and the very future of the planet. Here, it seems useful to retain the sex/gender distinction as a way of reminding ourselves that such behaviour is socially produced rather than inherent in all

in The futures of feminism
Practical consciousness knowledge, consciousness raising, the natural attitude and the social construction of reasonable/unreasonable
Mark Haugaard

, and sense of injustice; for instance, she may use her skills as a female to flatter men to gain advantage. Or, she be aware of the 2-D bias and somehow consider it inevitable because of reification, which we will come to in the next two chapters. Social change as resonance The idea of consciousness-raising does not reproduce the false-versus-true-consciousness dichotomy, yet it covers some of the same underlying intellectual territory. There is no foundational truth claim here. The #MeToo movement has not found an irrefutable Truth. Rather, a number of social

in The four dimensions of power
Deep versus shallow conflict and resistance
Mark Haugaard

a social actor gives up some desired goal because of a refusal to confirm-structure some Y-status (Israel-as-a-state, in this case) there is always an appeal to self-sacrifice and principle. In this spirit, the Iranian Youth and Sports Ministry commented upon Karimi as follows: ‘Your noble and heroic action in the world competition in Poland, abandoning the medal and podium in support of the highest human values, is a source of pride and praise’ (Haaretz 2018 ). To take a different example, with regard to economic resources, the #MeToo movement has

in The four dimensions of power
Valerie Bryson

, and many described a ‘click experience’ as separate pieces of knowledge and experience fell into place (Tobias, 1997 :5, 192). Since 1970, the concept has been developed by a number of feminist writers, and heavily criticised by others; at the beginning of the twenty-first century it was somewhat out of favour, but today it is quite widely used in popular discussion of #MeToo or the gender pay gap. While it can be used carelessly, or to make over-inflated claims, I believe that the concept of patriarchy continues to provide critical insights that can and should

in The futures of feminism
Tony Dundon, Miguel Martinez Lucio, Emma Hughes, Debra Howcroft, Arjan Keizer, and Roger Walden

, there remain challenges in extending the language and practice of equality, especially when faced with public policy prescriptions for austerity and global geo-political uncertainties (Durbin et al. , 2017 ). Furthermore, while the recent ‘MeToo’ movement (#MeToo online campaign) renders a promising example of global solidarity among females against sexual harassment and violence, it has also foregrounded the profound failure of organisational structures and legislation to shield women from abuse, and uncovered the pervading fear which often prevents them from

in Power, politics and influence at work