Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 36 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Of intersectionality, rage and injury
Amanda Gouws

, where women’s sexuality is portrayed through a male gaze. Sexual images are produced and reproduced for mass consumption, turning sex and sexuality into commodities, normalising in many ways sexual harassment and violence in the real world. Given the pervasiveness of sexual harassment and sexual violence, women’s pushback in 2017 came in a digital form when #MeToo allowed for the naming and shaming of men on social media platforms. Many men in power who got away with the most egregious types of violence were on the

in Intimacy and injury
Jaya Sharma

Even as #MeToo in India allowed so many to speak out, to name the sexual violations we face, to say enough is enough, it also raised serious dilemmas and concerns for us as feminists. I am referring here to concerns about how we as feminists were understanding and responding to issues of desire, power and consent as well as the ways in which we were engaging with each other around these issues. I am also referring more specifically to concerns that emerge from a queer feminist lens which make for a

in Intimacy and injury
Paromita Chakravarti and Jhelum Roy

Our current discussions on sexual harassment have become overdetermined by the #MeToo phenomenon. In India, Raya Sarkar’s List of sexual harassers in academia has defined the terms of recent feminist debates on sexual harassment in academia. 1 The List and the extensive social media discussions generated by it have shifted our gaze away from other developments in Indian higher education institutions, which in some ways anticipated and set the stage for the List. This chapter examines this ‘pre-history’ by

in Intimacy and injury
A feminist media house reports from the hinterland
Disha Mullick

Introduction: #MeToo and the universe of Indian media The latter part of the twentieth century, synchronous with the women’s movement in India and the second wave of feminism in Western countries, saw the entry of large numbers of middle-class women into certain domains of work. The news media and the entertainment industry in India, for instance, have been domains of work occupied by ‘privileged’ women, in terms of class, caste and mobility. Similar to other forms of public engagement, women’s entry into

in Intimacy and injury
Abstract only
In the wake of #MeToo in India and South Africa

Intimacy and Injury maps the travels of the global #MeToo movement in India and South Africa. Both countries have shared the infamy of being labelled the world’s ‘rape capitals’, with high levels of everyday gender-based and sexual violence. At the same time, they boast long histories of resisting such violence and its location in wider cultures of patriarchy, settler colonialism and class and caste privilege. Northern voices and experiences have dominated debates on #MeToo, which, while originating in the US, had considerable traction elsewhere, including in the global south. In India, #MeToo revitalised longstanding feminist struggles around sexual violence, offering new tactics and repertoires. In South Africa, it drew on new cultures of opposing sexual violence that developed online and in student protest. There were also marked differences in the ways in which #MeToo travelled in both countries, pointing to older histories of power, powerlessness and resistance. The book uses the #MeToo moment to track histories of feminist organising in both countries, while also revealing how newer strategies extended or limited these struggles. Intimacy and Injury is a timely mapping of a shifting political field around gender-based violence in the global south. In proposing comparative, interdisciplinary, ethnographically rich and analytically astute reflections on #MeToo, it provides new and potentially transformative directions to scholarly debates, which are rarely brought into conversation with one another. With contributors located in South Africa and India alone, this book builds transnational feminist knowledge and solidarity in and across the global south.

Abstract only
‘When will the state be #MeToo’d?’
Jyotsna Siddharth

The discourse on #MeToo in India changed a few things. It gave upper-caste, upper-class, cis women in India a moment to express their agency to bring public attention to their sexual offender. It created, for them, a space to publicly express their anger offering a moment of celebration for the contemporary feminist movement. This moment may be seen to have brought some respite to this subset of women who experienced sexual harassment and violation. One might argue that this moment was useful but partial

in Intimacy and injury
Abstract only
Beyond the media storm – on sexual harassment in the news and the newsrooms
Nithila Kanagasabai

Tejpal – including his apology emails in which he admitted to non-consensual conduct towards the survivor – he was acquitted of all charges. The survivor, on the other hand, was discredited, with her sexual history being invoked (though such a move is deemed to be unlawful according to Indian law), and accused of not doing enough to protect herself and of not looking sufficiently traumatised after the event. Coming more than nearly two years after #MeToo went viral in October 2018, a year after the news of Hollywood

in Intimacy and injury
Rupali Bansode

sidelined, erased or concealed. This erasure, sidelining or concealment of Dalit women’s experiences of sexual violence is, at times, intentional and, at others, not. Further, the chapter discusses how India’s #MeToo movement, although initiated by the Dalit-Bahujan feminists, also remains limited in engaging with the phenomenon of caste-based sexual violence. The chapter is divided into four sections. The first details the caste atrocity committed against Satyabhama. The second discusses Dalit women’s position in

in Intimacy and injury
Abstract only
Intimacy, injury and #MeToo in India and South Africa
Nicky Falkof, Shilpa Phadke, and Srila Roy

In a short period of time, we have witnessed both the seismic effects of the #MeToo movement and its ageing. We have felt the optimism that gathered as the hashtag travelled, while being sceptical about this particular wave of ‘clicktivism’. Even as we saw how an individualised ‘me’ gathered and mobilised an ever-widening ‘too’ – exemplifying how a hashtag amalgamates individual experiences into a story of systemic harm and mobilises collective solidarity (Clark-Parsons, 2019 ) – worries accumulated. For

in Intimacy and injury
Understanding changes in the legal landscape of sexual harassment in India
Rukmini Sen

Introduction: pre- and post-#MeToo in feminist politics? While there have been multiple ways in which feminist politics is experienced and transacted in the Indian context, #MeToo has undoubtedly transformed both the language and the practice of feminism. This chapter argues that the #MeToo moment in India became an important turning point for how the Indian women’s movement engaged with legal processes. Rupan Deol Bajaj was the first woman in Indian legal history to secure a conviction against her

in Intimacy and injury