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Chari Larsson

Across the breadth of his project Didi-Huberman has repeatedly declared his debt to Michel Foucault’s The Archaeology of Knowledge . In his first text, Invention of Hysteria , Didi-Huberman observed, ‘Archaeology tries to define not the thoughts, representations, images, themes, preoccupations that are concealed or revealed in discourses; but those discourses themselves, those discourses as practices obeying certain rules.’ 1 In the preface to the English edition of Confronting Images , he broadens his gaze from the birth of modern psychology at the

in Didi-Huberman and the image
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Chari Larsson

signals his ongoing engagement with the arguments advanced in Michel Foucault’s The Archaeology of Knowledge . In his opening paragraph, Foucault established archaeology’s hostility towards Hegelian-inspired, progressivist views of historical continuity, the longue durée of the Annales historians: For many years now historians have preferred to turn their attention to long periods, as if, beneath the shifts and changes of political events, they were trying to reveal the stable, almost indestructible system of checks and balances, the irreversible processes

in Didi-Huberman and the image
Andy Campbell

and relational virtualities, not so much through the intrinsic qualities of the homosexual but because the ‘slantwise’ position of the latter, as it were, the diagonal lines he can lay out in the social fabric allow these virtualities to come to light. Michel Foucault23 Foucault’s interest in reading the diagonal lines homosexuals trace in the social fabric could be handily connected to how he accessed archives. Historian Mike Featherstone has usefully described how Foucault used the ‘French national libraries in highly unorthodox ways by reading seemingly

in Bound together
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Sara Callahan

century. Michel Foucault and the archive as the law of what can be said Poststructuralist critique of history, particularly that delivered by French philosopher Michel Foucault, greatly contributed to a changed notion of the archive in the second half of the twentieth century. Foucault's importance for the increased interest in theorising archives stems in part from the way that the vocabulary and focus on archives was one of the key aspects of his early epistemology. Critical of the notion that the past is somehow out there

in Art + Archive
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Ory Bartal

subjectivity, transforming them to a large extent into an object of social activity rather than a subject or initiator. This condition calls to mind Michel Foucault’s understanding of culture as structured around specific discourses, values, and norms that serve as powerful mechanisms of social and cultural surveillance, and enable powerful social groups to subject and control other groups.60 These discourses and values are culturally accepted as natural, while in fact embodying the hegemonic norms of the dominant group and policing us to unconsciously conform to ‘acceptable

in Critical design in Japan
Author: Chari Larsson

Didi-Huberman and the image is an introduction to French art historian and philosopher Georges Didi-Huberman. With an enormous body of work spanning four decades, Didi-Huberman is considered one of the most innovative and influential critical thinkers writing in France today. In this monograph art historian Chari Larsson presents the first extensive English-language study of Didi-Huberman’s research on images. Placing Didi-Huberman’s project in relation to major historical and philosophical frameworks, this book shows not only how Didi-Huberman modifies dominant traditions, but also how the study of images is central to a new way of thinking about poststructuralist-inspired art history. This book explores the origins of Didi-Huberman’s project, arguing he has sought renewal by turning the discipline of art history on its axis, wresting it away from its founding ‘fathers’ such as Giorgio Vasari and Erwin Panofsky and instead reorganising it along the poststructuralist lines of Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida and Gilles Deleuze. An image is a form of representation, but what is the philosophical framework supporting it? Didi-Huberman takes up this question repeatedly over the course of his career.

Kuba Szreder

2013 : 105). The model of the ‘mini-firm’ is not ideologically neutral, as artists and curators have to become entrepreneurs of the self in accord with the premises of → neoliberalism . Michel Foucault created the concept of the ‘entrepreneur of himself’ to discuss this tendency towards individuation, describing this state as ‘being for himself his own capital, being for himself his own producer, being for himself the source of [his] earnings’ (Foucault 2010 : 226). The entrepreneur of himself is not only individually responsible for his own

in The ABC of the projectariat
Ruth Pelzer-Montada

Part I is titled ‘Genealogy’ instead of the more conventional ‘history’. It signals the insight, following Michel Foucault, that historical accounts, far from being ‘objective’, exist as the result of discourses and are hence subject to change. In a recent essay, the eminent American Renaissance print scholar and curator Peter Parshall ( 2016

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Declan Long

questions of the certainties of progress; an art concerned to make difficult that which has, in some other contexts, been made to seem straightforward (to invoke here a comment made by Michel Foucault on the idea of critique7). It is, therefore, through an insistence on avoiding closure, on aesthetic qualities of provisionality and precariousness, on constant alertness to the haunting of the present, that art can, potentially at least, point us towards the necessary antagonism of ‘the political’ –​ making inconveniently visible, as Chantal Mouffe has said, ‘what the

in Ghost-haunted land
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Sara Callahan

related to a wider cross-disciplinary theorising of archives, I have argued that the ubiquity of the archive in art discourse must be connected to conditions very specific to contemporary art. One of this book's key propositions is that the notion of the archive comes to be intertwined with the structural underpinning of the post-war artworld. The notion of the archive formulated by Michel Foucault as ‘the law of what can be said’ could be seamlessly attached to the institutional theory of art, which had replaced the previous grounding of artworks in a teleological

in Art + Archive