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Joel M. Dodson

 196 11 Foucault, confession, and Donne Joel M. Dodson This chapter reconsiders Michel Foucault’s critique of confession in order to examine, in slightly broader yet more methodological terms, what exactly we mean by negotiating ‘confessional’ conflict in late Reformation English literature. My aim is to use Foucault to re-​think Foucault:  to read Foucault’s later lectures on the ‘care of the self ’ as an alternate model for historicizing doctrinal affiliation in late Tudor and early Stuart literature rather than the penal or penitential vocabulary elaborated

in Forms of faith
Elliot Vernon

received his punishment penitently. On the scaffold he was expected to admit his crimes, confess his sins and vindicate the state’s authority in executing him for his treason. Many scholars, following Michel Foucault, have noted that early modern executions were stage-managed dramas that sought to publicly exhibit the inscription of the state’s de facto power on to the bodies of its citizens. 93 However, as Lake and Questier’s work suggests, this type of Foucauldian analysis relies on an abstract and structurally

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
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Conversation, friendship and democratic possibilities
Ruth Sheldon

This chapter foregrounds my approach to ethics as a ‘new’ ethnographic object. I show how an attentive ethnographic sensibility can uncover forms of interpersonal relationality, which diverge from a politics of interminable opposition. Learning from Veena Das’ work, I turn away from the most visible campus ‘events’ and toward a seemingly mundane student meeting in order to address the following question: how, in a politically polarised context, do friendships and alternative sociabilities become possible? I offer an ethnographic account of a small scale gathering of students involved in an ‘Israel-Palestine Forum’ at Redbrick University. Tracing the interpersonal and institutional conditions of this meeting, I show how its participants cultivated practices of speaking and listening, which enabled us to engage with each other as uncertain, ambivalent and fragmented subjects. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s ethics of ‘parrhesia’ and Stanley Cavell’s insights into the pedagogic dimensions of democratic relationships, I explore how risk-taking, trust and singular friendships enabled the tragic histories of Palestine-Israel to be spoken and reflected upon. The chapter concludes with some comparative insights in relation to my three fieldsites, highlighting how the differential impacts of socio-economic changes to higher education can limit these democratic possibilities within campuses.

in Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics
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Unsettling subjects of justice and ethics
Ruth Sheldon

engagement with a small-​scale gathering of students involved in the ‘Israel–​Palestine Forum’ at Redbrick University. Here students sought to engage with the same entangled histories of Palestine–​Israel which, as explored in Chapter 4, had provoked violent outbursts at Old University. Tracing the interpersonal and institutional conditions of this meeting, I show how its participants cultivated practices of speaking and 11 Introduction listening which enabled us to engage with each other as uncertain, ambivalent and fragmented subjects. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s

in Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics
David Geiringer

. 1 John Ryan cartoon published in the Catholic Herald , 2 August 1968 Catholic marriage preparation The interviewees were of a generation whose sex lives were subjected to an unparalleled level of attention from Church institutions. Disciples of the theorist Michel Foucault would claim

in The Pope and the pill
Heather Walton

us, there are important differences in both our use of poststructuralist theory and our understandings of where our political readings might lead us. Sands chooses to employ the work of Michel Foucault alone from the assorted band of contemporary continental theorists as her guide and mentor in the construction of post-age theological thinking. This may be (I think it is) because Foucault appears to be the most assimilable of all the poststructuralist thinkers. His work is clearly applicable to concrete social problems. His writing contains the most recognisable

in Literature, theology and feminism
Heather Walton

religious feminists’ engagement with women’s literature, and here poststructuralism forces consideration of yet more difficult problems. Two essays written in the late 1960s by Roland Barthes (1977 [1968]) and Michel Foucault (1979 [1969]) with the provocative titles, ‘The Death of the Author’ and ‘What Is an Author?’, issued a challenge to Western theory to consider the key role the concept of authorship plays in defining the origins, meaning and limits of texts and in structuring reading as the passive reception of an author’s work. Foucault’s essay ends with a question

in Literature, theology and feminism
Nancy Jiwon Cho

of every misdeed, behaviour must be regulated at all times: 6. O may I now for ever fear T’indulge a sinful Thought Since the Great God can see, and hear, And writes down every Fault! 16 Watts’s teaching about self-discipline can be illuminated by Michel Foucault’s theory that Jeremy Bentham’s panopticon demonstrates a shifting discourse in the eighteenth century from punition to reform

in Religion and life cycles in early modern England
Helen Rogers

(1764–1823) and Mary Wollstonecraft (1759–97). See Melman, The Culture of History: English Uses of the Past, 1800–1953 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006), p. 157. 23 Booth, How to Make It, pp. 148, 125–7, 160–5. 24 Fry’s journal, 14 April 1817, cited in Fry, Memoir, I: p. 261. 25 Randall McGowen, ‘A powerful sympathy: terror, the prison, and humanitarian reform in early nineteenth-­century Britain’, Journal of British Studies, 25 (1986), 312–34. 26 Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, trans. Alan Sheridan (1975; Harmondsworth

in Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain
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David Geiringer

his story of pathological discourses usurping Catholic regimes of regulation, Michel Foucault claimed to reconceptualise the way power worked in relation to the sexual subject. Whether through confessional or therapeutic techniques, discipline and governance have been exercised as much from within the individual as from without according to Foucault. 42 His model of historical change was therefore

in The Pope and the pill