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Shakespeare in the time of the political
Richard Wilson

: I’ll join with black despair against my soul And to myself become an enemy. [ Richard III, 2,2,36–7 ] Historian Paul Veyne likens Shakespeare to Michel Foucault for his ‘sceptic renouncement’ of a self-presence that would make sense of the world. 50 For at

in Free Will
Pascale Drouet

unpleasant to him, thus testifying that they, the speaker, are ethically autonomous. The frank speaker fights against the flattery and hypocrisy that Shakespeare, in Sonnet 114, considers as ‘the monarch’s plague’. 46 Fearless speech comes from the Greek term parrhesia to which Michel Foucault devoted a substantial cycle of conferences at the Collège de France in the early 1980s. According to Foucault, ‘Parrhesia consists in

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
John Drakakis

criticism of the play. One other co-ordinate informs their approach, and it comes from the post-structuralist account of ‘discourse’ associated with the work of Michel Foucault. Barker and Hulme argue that while ‘[i]ntertextuality has usefully directed attention to the relationship between texts: discourse moves us towards a clarification of just what kinds of relationship are involved’. 27 They argue that the concept of intertextuality has been ‘unable to break out of the practice of connecting text with text, of

in Shakespeare’s resources
Banishment, abuse of power and strategies of resistance
Author: Pascale Drouet

This book analyses three Shakespearean plays that mainly deal with abusive forms of banishment: King Richard II, Coriolanus and King Lear. These plays present with particular clarity the mechanism of the banishment proclamation and its consequences, that is, the dynamic of exclusion and its repercussions. Those repercussions may entail breaking the ban to come back illegally and seek revenge; devising strategies of deviation, such as disguise and change of identity; or resorting to mental subterfuges as a means of refuge. They may also lead to entropy – exhaustion, letting go or heartbreak. Each in its own way, they invite us to reflect upon the complex articulation between banishment and abuse of power, upon the strategies of resistance and displacement employed to shun or endure the painful experience of ‘deterritorialisation’; they put into play the dialectics of allegiance and disobedience, of fearlessly speaking and silencing, of endurance and exhaustion; they question both the legitimacy of power and the limits of human resistance. This study draws on French scholars in Shakespearean studies, and also on contemporary French historians, theorists, anthropologists, psychoanalysts, essayists and philosophers, who can help us read Shakespeare’s plays in our time. It thus takes into account some of the works of Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Gaston Bachelard, Marcel Detienne and Jean-Pierre Vernant, Boris Cyrulnik and Emmanuel Housset. The hope is that their respective intellectual approaches will shed specific kinds of light on Shakespeare’s plays and initiate a fruitful dialogue with Anglo-Saxon criticism.

Abstract only
John Drakakis

’s ‘oral form, and its tonal aspects’ (p. 70). 23 Jeffrey Masten, Textual Intercourse: Collaboration, Authorship and Sexualities in Renaissance Drama (Cambridge, 1997), p. 3. 24 Ibid. , p. 15. 25 Ibid. , p. 20. 26 Ibid. , p. 13. 27 Ibid. , p. 14. 28 Michel Foucault, Language, Counter-memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews , trans

in Shakespeare’s resources
John Drakakis

and Neil Taylor, Arden 3 series, revised edn (London, 2016), pp. 289–90). 10 Thompson and Taylor, in Hamlet (2016), p. 498 n. 2. 11 Michel Foucault, ‘What Is an Author?’, Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews , trans. Donald Bouchard and Sherry Simon, ed. Donald Bouchard (Oxford, 1977), p. 123. 12 Ibid. , n. 19. 13 See Mark Kaethler, ‘Shakespeare and cognition: scientism

in Shakespeare’s resources
John Drakakis

stop short of exploring the process of production of meanings and the consequences that follow from it. Barthes presents a very real challenge to what Michel Foucault in his essay ‘What Is an Author’ asserts as the modern identity of the literary work ‘dominated by the sovereignty of the author’. 91 Foucault’s focus is upon a criticism that ‘has been concerned for some time now with aspects of text not fully dependent on the notion of an individual creator’. 92 But more importantly, he relocates those elements of the

in Shakespeare’s resources
Abstract only
Pascale Drouet

To ‘put to the ban’, to ‘condemn by public edict or sentence to leave the country’, to ‘exile’, to ‘expatriate’: these are the objective definitions of the verb ‘banish’. 1 Taking practice and subjective experience into account, Michel Foucault specifies that to banish is also to ‘destroy the home, erase the place of birth, confiscate goods and properties’, 2 that is, radically to uproot what

in Shakespeare and the denial of territory
Abstract only
Hysteria, paranoia, psychosis
Jeremy Tambling

This chapter begins with three of Sigmund Freud's 'case-histories': Dora, diagnosed as hysterical; Schreber, a paranoid schizophrenic, and the Wolf Man (a case of infantile neurosis), in order to approach Jacques Lacan on paranoia and psychosis. Commenting on Dora, who was neurotic, and non-psychotic, Lacan says that psychosis requires 'disturbances of language', which makes it exceed paranoia. Freud makes Schreber an instance of paranoia, using for evidence, virtually, only the Memoirs, which he reads as a text. He examines his hypochondria, and feelings of being persecuted by certain people including Flechsig, the 'soul-murderer', and his delusional ideas, including believing that he had direct contact with God. The difference between Freud and Michel Foucault becomes key to reading modern literature. It seems that madness becomes not a danger for the writer but a condition that attends writing, as though writing had become madness, a marker of alienation.

in Literature and psychoanalysis
Abstract only
Richard Wilson

pleasant Willy’, Edmund Spenser, ‘The Tears of the Muses’ (1591), quoted in Ernst Honigmann, Shakespeare: The ‘Lost Years ’ (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1985), pp. 71–2. 25 Michel Foucault, Abnormal: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1974–1975 , trans. Graham Burchell (New York

in Free Will